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Posts Tagged ‘Paul Bettany’

The Tourist – Timothy Dalton and Berkoff join Depp and Jolie

Posted by LiveFor on March 26, 2010

Timothy Dalton and Steven Berkoff have joined the cast of GK Films’ romance-drama “The Tourist,” starring Angelina Jolie and Johnny Depp according to Variety.

The film directed by Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck also stars Paul Bettany and Rufus Sewell. It’s shooting on location in Venice and will be released by Sony.

“The Tourist,” penned by Julian Fellowes & Christopher McQuarrie and Jeffrey Nachmanoff, centers on an American tourist visiting Italy to mend a broken heart who pursues a romance with a woman who deliberately crosses his path. The couple are then caught in a whirlwind of intrigue and danger.

The cast for this one just keeps on getting better.

Call me Ishmael

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Legion, 2010 – Movie Review. Watch out for Angels

Posted by LiveFor on March 5, 2010

Director: Scott Stewart
Starring: Paul Bettany, Dennis Quaid, Lucas Black, Charles S. Dutton, Tyrese Gibson
Released: 5th March 2010

This review by Richard Bodsworth.

Whether it is a moody Nic Cage, a filthy chain smoking dancing John Travolta, or a gang of chicks directed by McG, angels tend to get a bad rap in films. But how about a tooled up Paul Bettany holed up in an arse end of nowhere diner protecting mankinds last hope? Sounds like fun, right? Uh, not so much…

Furious at what humanity has become (damn you Simon Cowell) God has decided to wipe everyone out with an army of angels led by Archangel Gabriel. Surely a flood would have been easier? Unhappy at his masters’ plans, Archangel Michael (Bettany) cuts off his wings, gets himself some guns and sets off to a diner in the middle of New Mexico to protect a pregnant woman whose child is the key to the survival of the human race. There he is joined by a group of people who must help fight off the horde intent on killing them.
When the trailer debuted for Legion it seemed a ridiculously fun time would be had for all. The premise seemed like good old Hollywood fun, no doubt accompanied with cheap thrills, explosions and gunfire aplenty but what we have ended up with is a dull mess.

The opening, with its heavy handed characterisation and Hallmark movie music could have been forgiven if the action scenes were enjoyable, but they are not. With a complete lack of imagination during the gun battles, mid shot, he shoots, bad guy shoots back from long shot, it feels the job of editing has been left in the incapable hands of a high school student. Perhaps the students buddy would have made a better job of the CGI which at times is jaw-droppingly awful; this is confusing considering the director is a former visual effects developer. The cast, on paper, could be considered ‘strong’, but on closer inspection they are as flat as the characters they portray; Lucas ‘personality of a shit rooting pig’ Black turns in another outstandingly boring performance, Tyrese Gibson again plays the stereotypical ‘angry black man’ and you really do have to ask yourself how Dennis Quaid manages to get work? Seriously! Paul Bettanys Michael is angry and emotionless, his character attempts to be developed by flashbacks, but again the whole thing is rather dull.

To be fair, one fight does provide a cheap thrill or two and the crazed old lady is probably the standout but this is another case of the best parts being in the trailer. The main reason for the films failure is that it takes itself far too seriously. If Legion turned out to be a badly made yet fun B-Movie type it might have been better, but an intriguing premise has been destroyed by bad direction and a poorly written script which features far too many dialogue heavy scenes that include this Oscar bait, “I’m gonna get my bible, someone gotta start praying!”.

Remember as kids when it rained you would say, “that’s God taking a pee”? In years to come when kids see Legion they will say “That’s God taking a fat steaming turd”.

Verdict: *

Avoid like the plague!

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UPDATED: Exclusive Interview – Paul McGuigan talks modern day Sherlock Holmes, Deathlok, Bond, Grant Morrison and more

Posted by LiveFor on February 22, 2010

Scottish director Paul McGuigan made his name with British gangster film, Gangster Number 1 before moving across to the States where he worked with big names such as Josh Hartnett, Bruce Willis and Morgan Freeman in Lucky Number Slevin. With his energetic and unique visual style, McGuigan is one of the biggest Scottish directors working in Hollywood today. We were lucky enough to catch up with Paul to discuss his previous films and his upcoming projects. Richard of LFF took the interview so without further ado over to Rich.

When I call, he is taking a break from editing his latest project; a modern day take on Sherlock Holmes for the BBC with Benedict Cumberbatch as Holmes and Martin Freeman as his loyal sidekick Watson. Three feature length episodes are planned; McGuigan will direct the first due out in the autumn.

(Noise)
PM: Sorry, I’m editing next to Dr Who, there was a big meeting today it’s a bit noisy

McGuigan eventually finds a quite spot in the corner and I open by trying to grab some information about the rumours surrounding his next film.

LFF: So I heard some news about a new project this morning, can you talk about it?

PM: Well I’m hoping to sign on in the next few days.

LFF: It’s written by the guys that did The Hangover, right?

PM: Yeah, it’s their next film.

LFF: Is it a flat out comedy?

PM: It’s a comedy thriller. But I’m waiting until the ink has been dried on the contract before I can really start talking about it.

The Acid House


LFF: Of course. So I was going to start by talking about some of your older films, The Acid House was your first feature, right?

PM: It was yeah, it was three short stories. I initially directed one short called The Granton Star Cause and it did pretty well on Channel 4 so they wanted to do all three. I’d only done documentaries before and was a photographer before that, so when Irvine Welsh asked me to do it, I initially turned it down because it wasn’t what I was used to doing. But then he told me about the story about the man having a bad day, meeting God in the pub and it was just crazy! I thought if it’s going to fail I may as well go out in a blaze of glory. It turned out to be such fun to do, Channel 4 wanted it to be a proper Irvine Welsh story and not filter it for an English audience. It was fun.

Paul Bettany in Gangster Number 1


LFF: So after that you made Little Angels (a docu-drama focusing on heroin addicts) and Gangster Number 1. Along with The Acid House, did you get the feeling you were marked as a controversial director?

PM: Aye, but I’d say life is pretty controversial, I mean you’re going to come cross times when you’re not in a good place. Sometime real life is not filtered through on to the screen in the way some people would like it to. Life imitates art whereas art never usually imitates life and art always imitates art if you will, so for a genre like gangster films the only reference points we have of gangsters are through the cinema, and we just keep copying ourselves which means we portray gangsters in a certain way. But that’s fine that’s a good way of getting to an audience because they are comfortable with that, it’s what they are used to, but then you have to start breaking down some of the barriers of it. The lifestyle isn’t always glamorous; it can be ugly and violent. I always think violence is a hard thing for a director to portray; I don’t want to advocate it’s like pornography where you get off on it because that’s not the case. Violence to me is always the sounds and the hatred in the person perpetrating the violence. So what I wanted to do (In Gangster) was kill the audience that were watching it, you don’t see much when Paul Bettany strips naked and butchers the guy with an axe, but it’s still a very violent scene. I didn’t want to let the audience off with that you know? I wanted to show that violence was not glamorous. It’s also hard trying to find new ways to shoot violence, give it an original point of view to all the others.

LFF: Even though a lot of people really like Gangster Number 1, do you think it’s a bit underrated?

PM: I think a lot of my films are. Any director will tell you that about their movies. It seems to take time for people to find my movies. It’s like Lucky Number Slevin, it didn’t make millions at box office but then went on to make a ton on DVD. It’s almost like people found it and went “oh I’ve found this cool movie” and then claim it for themselves. It was the same with The Acid house.

LFF: I think I know what you mean. I stumbled across Wicker Park in Blockbuster, had never heard of it but I went on to enjoy it.

PM: Yeah It’s strange. I don’t think my style is as palatable to a mainstream audience marketable and it is to certain people. Production companies always seem to find them hard to market. Its like, “is Wicker Park a love story? Is it a thriller?” Well no, it’s not a love story because if it was a love story I would have shot it differently, so yeah it’s a thriller. So they always seem to have a problem marketing it.

The Reckoning


LFF: I was reading up on a film called The Reckoning but I had never heard of it.

PM: Well the reckoning is a prime example of bad marketing. I’m working with the likes of Martin Freeman and Benedict and they have never heard of it, it’s about the birth of modern day theatre you’d have thought they might have seen it! (laughs) It’s not bad, beautiful looking film, but it’s quite an art house movie, I wasn’t trying to make a mainstream film I just wanted to make a film about something I thought was interesting.

LFF: It boasts a great cast too.

PM: Yeah it’s got Paul Bettany, Vincent Cassell is in it, Wilem Defoe, Brian Cox.

LFF: I can’t seem to find it anywhere!

PM: (laughs) well there you go! But essentially it’s an expensive art house film lets put it that way, ill hold my hands up and say that’s what it is. But after that I realised I just needed to concentrate on what I’m best at and try and make films people want to see.

LFF: So after that you moved to the US, was it Gangster that brought you attention from America?

PM: Yeah it definitely was, it was a great calling card. I got a call from Robert Newman and he said it was getting a great reaction. After that I got the chance to meet Bruce Willis and some other big actors who said they wanted to work with me, and later on they came true to their word and worked with me on different projects over the years. But it still is a great calling card, people really like it.

McGuigan and Freeman - Lucky Number Slevin


LFF: After you completed Wicker Park in the US, would you say Slevin cemented you over there?

PM: To be honest it’s all indie companies I’ve worked for so I’ve always been on that side of the fence. Even with Push, I’ve never a studio movie.

LFF: I assume the next one will be for a studio?

PM: It’s not like I go out of my way to avoid it. I have been attached to various Marvel projects to James Bond.

LFF: Really?

PM: Yeah for Casino Royale. I was down to the last two, it would have been great and I haven’t given that one up just yet. Not like playing for Glasgow Celtic or playing in front of a crowd at the Barrowlands, some things you have to give up (laughs) but that’s not one of them.

LFF: Who would you cast as Bond?

PM: I think James McAvoy would be great. Daniel Craig is very good though. The thing that I didn’t like about Quantum of Solace is it took itself too god damn seriously. There’s a great sense of fun attached to Bond films and that has to be embraced, you can be serious when it’s required, but you just have to relax a bit.

Deathlok

LFF: Another project you were linked to was Deathlok

PM: Deathlok was just taking too long in development. David Self wrote it and it was a great script, the hardest thing bout Deathlok and this sounds crazy but was to get the idea of Knight Rider out of my head! Just couldn’t get over that. I really wanted to do that film but I had to put on the backburner.

LFF: But you got to kind of make a ‘superhero’ film with Push.

PM: I suppose so, yeah, but I never really approached it that way. Push was me wanting to do an action film, you know? Before the Acid House I never watched Trainspotting, so I never watched X Men or anything like that which might have influenced the way I do things, I just like to do my own thing. But obviously certain people and studios always want certain things in there.

LFF: Push isn’t as glossy, if you will, compared to other ‘superhero’ films

PM: I would have made it grittier if I could have! But what you have to remember is with these ‘superhero’ films if you want to call them, is that you’re up against these big budget pieces with the greatest technologies available. Push was made for $25m, which is a lot of money, but that’s not much compared to those films which are up to £100m now. But that shouldn’t put off and I think it’s a pretty cool movie.

McGuigan with Chris Evans - Push


LFF: So let’s talk about Sherlock again, is it anything with Guy Ritchie’s recent film?

PM: No. It’s written by Steven Moffat who does Doctor Who and Mark Gatiss from League of Gentlemen. They are big fans and wanted to do an updated version, he has to be smarter now he’s up against all this new technology. I think it’s harder to make him modern and immediate being set in the present day rather than back in the olden days. I thought Guy Ritchie’s film was entertaining, but that’s what it has to be as a lot of people see it as a bit of a romp. But we want to bring it back to the clever detective side. The BBC are putting a bit of a wedge behind it so hopefully it will do well.

LFF: So no pipes and hats then?

PM: (laughs) No, no hats, but I thought that might be cool. He’s covered in nicotine patches and that kinda stuff. It pays homage to the originals, it still feels like Baker Street but with plasmas televisions.

Grant Morrison


LFF: The Acid House is still the only thing you have filmed in Scotland, would you be interested in making something else there?

PM: Yeah Grant Morrison and myself are working on, I wouldn’t call it a secret project, but a project with Stephen Fry and it’s a thriller set in Scotland. Me and Grant have been friends for a while and we wanted to do something together and Grant went off and wrote a treatment, so it’s at the treatment stage at the moment.

UPDATE: The show is going to be called Bonnyroad according to Bleeding Cool. END OF LINE

LFF: Is it a full series?

PM: It’s seven episodes. It takes place over seven days around an event that happens in Scotland. It’s a modern take on an old fable or fairy story. If you know Grants work you might have an idea of what it will be like. It’s like Twin Peaks meets Brigadoon! It’s off the wall and smart but in a watchable commercial way. It’s still in the early stages but I’m very excited about it.

LFF: There’s still not a large amount of ‘big’ Scottish directors out there at the moment.

PM: I think we quietly work away, you’ve got MacKenzie and Peter Mullan who I think is great, he has a story to tell. So not quite a full squad yet, we’ve probably got a five a side.

LFF: Do you think more could be done to help develop talent?

PM: There has to be grassroots. Eighteen year olds will look at it and think, “I can’t see a career for me here”, so they make it creating video games and things like that. We need to change that mindset and get back into it. I read some stats the other day and it said film and television in Scotland work an average of seven days a year, that’s no career it’s almost a hobby. It’s sad. But the BBC seem to be keen in putting some money in and hopefully it’s just a bump in the road. There’s some great talent up here, it just needs to be harvested.

LFF: Mark Millar is rumoured to be writing a Scottish superhero tale. Would a film version interest you?

PM: Mark’s a talented boy, but I don’t think he will work with me after I slagged off his last film, Wanted. I never insulted him directly because he didn’t even write the screenplay and I wouldn’t intentionally slag off someone else’s work but certain people stirred it up. The funniest part was when Morgan Freeman, who I adore, started talking about the weavers or something. I just wanted to pause it and rewind it in the cinema and say, “sorry, are they trying to tell us this makes any sense?!” But good luck and good power to the man.

Check out the other LFF interviews including Duncan Jones, Mike Sizemore, Johnny Depp, Tony Grisoni, Michael Marshall Smith, Neal Asher, Leslie Simpson and more.

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Legion – News on how the cast of the Angels at War film came to pass

Posted by LiveFor on February 16, 2010


A dusty diner in the Mojave Desert becomes ground zero for earth’s final showdown in Legion, a startlingly original and terrifying vision of the Apocalypse from director and writer Scott Stewart (Priest). As mankind destroys itself in a savage fury, a small group of people trapped on the edge of nowhere prepare to make a last stand—with the help of a mysterious and powerful stranger.

Unaware of the chaos unfolding around the globe, Bob Hanson (Dennis Quaid), the owner of a remote roadside café, and his partner Percy (Charles S. Dutton) go about business as usual. The restaurant’s beautiful and very pregnant waitress, Charlie (Adrianne Palicki), serves breakfast to Sandra and Howard, a well-heeled suburban couple (Kate Walsh and Jon Tenney) and their teenage daughter Audrey (Willa Holland), as they wait for their car to be repaired by Bob’s son, Jeep (Lucas Black).

When the television goes on the fritz and the phones go out, the group realizes they have lost all communication with the outside world. As they attempt to make sense of what’s happening—An earthquake? A terrorist attack?— an elderly woman (Jeannette Miller) arrives and sweetly orders a steak from Charlie. When her meal arrives, she begins spewing shocking obscenities. In a heartbeat, the fragile old lady develops superhuman strength, launching a grisly attack that leaves Howard critically injured.

A desperate attempt to get medical help ends when an impenetrable cloud of flying insects turns the diner into the only safe haven for miles. As the horrifying truth of their situation sinks in, a stranger (Paul Bettany) joins them with an arsenal of stolen weapons. He informs Charlie that her unborn baby is now humanity’s only hope, and he’s willing to do whatever it takes to save it.

The world is about to become a waking nightmare for the last remnants of mankind as rolling caravans of crazed killers arrive in search of fresh victims and an army of warrior angels bent on total destruction follows close behind them in a unique and terrifying glimpse of the End of Days.

Director Scott Stewart and Producer David Lancaster agreed from the beginning that in order for Legion to fulfill its potential as a character-driven action-thriller with supernatural themes, it would require an outstanding, highly committed cast. “The most important decisions a director makes are in casting a film,” says Stewart. “If you cast it right, so much is going your way from the start. To that end, Rick Montgomery, our casting director, was absolutely fearless. He understood that we were trying to aim high and defy expectations with the casting of the movie.”

The filmmakers succeeded in bringing together a first-rate cast that includes award-winning actors from both sides of the Atlantic. “We have the dream-come-true cast,” says Stewart. “It was so important to get these actors. We spend the whole movie locked in a diner with them, so the audience has to care about them. There are no disposable stock characters; everybody is there for a specific reason.”

The catalyst for the action of the film is Michael, a larger-than-life figure who seems to appear out of nowhere. “Michael has such conviction that the other characters follow him without question,” says Stewart. “I didn’t want him to be an enigma. He is the Archangel Michael, but you can’t play that abstraction.”

Paul Bettany, perhaps best known for his powerful performance as Silas in The Da Vinci Code, is a highly respected British actor who has worked with the Royal Shakespeare Company. Convincing him to play Michael seemed an audacious goal for the filmmakers. “Paul has the authority we needed, but given his pedigree, we weren’t sure he would be interested,” says Stewart.

Stewart had planned his presentation meticulously in an all-out effort to capture Bettany’s imagination. The actor was as intrigued by Stewart’s vision as he was by the film’s premise. “Scott pitched his movie better than anybody has ever pitched a movie to me before,” the actor says. “He had all kinds of visual aids. He’s a very impressive human being. There were rumors going around the set he went through Harvard and M.I.T. and Cambridge and Oxford by the time he was nineteen.”

The unusual thematic elements were icing on the cake for the actor. “It’s a really slick, fast-paced movie that is in no way stupid,” he says. “Traditionally Michael is the defender of mankind. He is known as the first in all heaven to bow down before mankind and he still has faith in humanity despite all the war and horror he sees. So he’s having a massive crisis of allegiance.”

Bettany’s unique qualities as an actor made him an ideal choice to play the conflicted archangel, says the director. “Paul has an incredible stillness that only the greatest actors possess. His work is almost surgical in its exactness and specificity. That helped make Michael a commanding, mysterious figure you immediately trust, even if you don’t fully understand why. He turned out to be the most tremendous partner a filmmaker could have, because he cared a lot about the film and about his character—but he also wanted to shoot a machine gun and have a good time.”

Having Bettany on board sent a message to the film community about the project. “It said that we were up to something very different,” says Stewart. “His presence made it easy to attract other high-caliber actors.”

Dennis Quaid, who plays Bob Hansen, the diner’s owner was one of the first to join Bettany. Quaid has been a popular leading man for more than 30 years, winning praise for performances in projects ranging from the 1979 classic Breaking Away to the recent summer blockbuster G.I Joe: Rise of the Cobra. But Stewart believes Quaid’s reputation as a movie star sometimes obscures his acting ability. “Because he’s been such a big star for so long, I think some people take his talent for granted,” says the director. “That’s a mistake. He’s incredibly entertaining to watch. And in Legion, he is able to play totally against type. Audiences are so used to him playing heroic characters that it will be a surprise to see him as Bob, a man who has taken several wrong turns in his life and lived to regret it. And he brought his crackerjack comic timing as well. There are some humorous moments in the script and Dennis made them all work.”

The opportunity to work with this cast was a major selling point for Quaid. “Working with really good actors makes you better,” he says. “With the emphasis that Scott put on creating realistic, three-dimensional people, we could really kick ass as far as where we went with our characters.”

Quaid was also drawn to the script’s deft mixture of high-octane thrills and serious undertones. “The story really has resonance,” he adds. “And at the same time, it’s very entertaining and a great action movie. Scott Stewart came up an original twist on the Biblical apocalypse.”

Quaid’s presence raised the film’s profile yet another notch, says Lancaster. “He immediately understood what we were trying to do. He would never just do a generic action-horror movie. What he and Paul both recognized was the opportunity to appeal to a wider audience. These are really fine actors who engaged in this because they see it as something special.”

Michael has come to the diner to find Charlie, a young, pregnant waitress he believes will figure prominently in the future of humankind. “We searched long and hard for an actress to play that key character before we found Adrianne Palicki,” says Lancaster. “Charlie is a girl from the wrong side of the tracks; she’s is pregnant, but doesn’t know who the father is, and has struggled with whether to keep her baby or give it up for adoption. Adrianne captured all of that in her performance.”

Stewart was initially unfamiliar with the actress’ work, but was immediately impressed by her authenticity. “She is not a Hollywood type,” he says. “She’s from Ohio and she brings a grounded realism to her work. And she’s also gorgeous in a very approachable way.”

For Palicki, one of the stars of the critically acclaimed television drama “Friday Night Lights,” the character of Charlie sealed the deal. “First and foremost, she was fantastic to play,” says the actress. “It’s one of the best female roles in my age group that I’ve seen and to be able embody such a strong, intricate character was very satisfying.

“In fact, every character in this movie has a strong arc,” she adds. “Every single person is trying to find their path. Scott was really great about letting me find my own voice. He was adamant about what he wanted, but he also did such a great job of letting us discover our characters for ourselves.”

Palicki was apprehensive about one scene in particular. “The childbirth scene was maybe the scariest thing I’ve ever done as an actor,” she admits. “I had a panic attack the day before we shot it, but there were plenty of women who supported me through that.”

The filmmakers were looking for a young actor who would embody honesty and integrity for the role of Jeep Hansen, Bob’s son and Charlie’s protector, when they met with Lucas Black. “With Lucas, what you see is what you get,” says Stewart. “He grew up in Alabama and now lives in Missouri. So he’s not a Hollywood-type guy and it shows in how real he is as Jeep.”

Black, who was barely a teenager when he starred opposite Billy Bob Thornton in Slingblade, was drawn to the script by Jeep’s journey over the course of the film. “He starts out as someone who pretty much keeps to himself, until Michael comes along and becomes a kind of mentor,” observes Black.

Black was also thrilled by the opportunity to work with an actor whose work he has admired for years. “Dennis Quaid is awesome,” he says. “Our father and son moments really fell into place. The real relationships between the characters bring a sense of realism to all the action—and there’s tons of it.”

The Biblical themes were very familiar to Black, who was raised a Southern Baptist in Alabama. “There’s some deep stuff in this movie,” he says. “Scott has put a really interesting twist on it that I think is going to interest a lot of people and create a lot of buzz.”

Bob’s partner in the diner, Percy, is played by Charles S. Dutton, a three-time Emmy® winner who has moved effortlessly between film, stage and television during a career that includes a recent appearance in Fame, as well as leading roles for acclaimed directors Robert Altman (Cookie’s Fortune) and John Sayles (Honeydripper). Stewart calls the actor “a force of nature.” “Charles has a great deal of integrity and maturity,” he says. “It’s awesome to have him in a genre film, because he really makes you believe the reality of any situation. When his character believes something in a film, no matter how fantastic, the audience believes it too.”

Dutton also brings a gravitas to his scenes, adds Lancaster. “He grasped the concept immediately,” says the producer. “Charles was able to speak very fluently about the fact that his character reads and studies the Bible. He responded strongly to the fact that a person of faith could identify with this movie.”

In fact, Percy’s uncomplicated faith was central to Dutton’s understanding of the character. “He says he knew this day was coming, he just didn’t think it would be in his lifetime,” points out Dutton. “He’s the only one willing to say a prayer, the only one willing to believe what’s occurring.”

Stewart’s script provided Dutton with a clear road map throughout the production, says the actor. “The characters are so well written that you immediately knew where you were. You didn’t have to ask a thousand questions. You just had to try to make each scene as emotionally believable as you could. And when you add it all up, you discover it’s the Apocalypse. The beauty of the script to me is that this bunch of misfits has to save the world. It’s audacious.”

But audiences needn’t take all of that too seriously, he adds. The film has a great deal of fun to offer as well. “It’s also a good old-fashioned horror film,” he says. “We’re trying to scare the hell out of audiences. I call it a three-pronged joy ride. It’ scary, it’s funny and it gives you something to think about.”

The director was also unaware of “Grey’s Anatomy’s” Kate Walsh before she auditioned for the role of Sandra. “I’m not a big TV watcher,” he confesses. “But the moment she came in, I knew I would never find a better actor to play Sandra. She was unafraid to go to a very dark place with the character.”

Lancaster says he was extremely excited Kate Walsh agreed to play Sandra, an upscale suburbanite trying to keep her daughter out of harm’s way, without much success. “I can’t think of a more interesting actress working in television right now than Kate,” says Lancaster. “She’s sexy and fun. She brought so much to that role and worked so well with Jon Tenney, who plays her husband, Howard.”

Walsh was won over by the script’s combination of well-defined characters and action. “There’s so much action in this movie and the circumstances are so extreme,” she says. “But it’s not only a great action story, it’s also a supernatural thriller and a love story. It has everything: birth, life, death. It’s very dense and very exciting.”

“When I read the script, I was terrified,” she admits. “I think the audience will be too. But there’s also great humor in it. That’s one of the best qualities of Scott’s writing. Everybody has some great kind of zingers.”

Willa Holland, who plays Howard and Sandra’s daughter Audrey, is familiar to television audiences as Kaitlin Cooper of “The O.C.” She says her character is different from most of the roles written for teens. “You get typecast as a teenager,” she says. “You can only get to a few different places. Audrey goes from the rebellious teenager to being her mother’s mother, and then being the savior of mankind.”

Holland confesses she has never seen a horror movie. “I’m deathly afraid of seeing scary movies,” she admits. “I get too freaked out. But I’m going to go to the theater for this one just to watch people’s reactions. “

The contingent trapped in the diner is completed by Kyle Williams, a divorced father trying to get to Los Angeles for a custody hearing. The filmmakers were happy to find Tyrese Gibson, one of the stars of the Transformer franchise and a Grammy winning recording artist, for the role. “Tyrese brings a clearly defined, through-line to his work,” says Lancaster. “He’s such a wonderful actor with so much presence that you just can’t take your eyes off of him. When he’s on screen, he fills it up.”

Michael’s nemesis in the film is also his brother, Gabriel, an archangel traditionally portrayed as God’s messenger and as the most faithful of His creations. A one-time ballet dancer who stands six feet, six inches tall, actor Kevin Durand brings both brawn and grace to the character. “Kevin is so compelling,” says Lancaster. “He moves beautifully but also has this incredibly menacing feeling about him.”

The filmmakers were impressed by Durand’s recent performances in X-Men Origins: Wolverine and as the cold-blooded mercenary Martin Keamy on the hit television series “Lost.” “We wanted somebody who could hold his own with Paul Bettany, who’s an imposing actor,” says Stewart. “Kevin has this awesome physical presence, and he backs it up with serious acting chops. He’s really a character actor inside the body of a major action star. What could be better than that?”

Legion appealed to Durand on a primal level, he says. “Gabriel is being sent to do God’s work, but in a way I don’t think we’ve ever seen before—by any means necessary.”

The through-line for the climactic confrontation between the two archangels could be called sibling rivalry taken to a cosmic extreme. “Paul and I played it like we were brothers who were always vying for the attention and love of their father,” says Durand. “Michael was the one who got most of the love, without having to abide by the rules. Gabriel always went by the book and never got the attention he thought he deserved. This battle comes down to eons of competition.”

The filmmakers secured the legendary character actor Doug Jones for an astonishing cameo. Jones, who played Abe Sapien in the Hellboy movies, as well as the Faun in Pan’s Labyrinth, embodies all that is terrifying in this film as an ice cream man in the throes of a dreadful transformation. And he may just be the most flexible man on the planet. “He’s incredible,” says Stewart. “I understand why Guillermo del Toro likes him so much. He’s a great actor, but he’s also the Cirque de Soleil of actors. He’s so elastic and expressive in his face and he can do things that you would normally think you’d need prosthetics for.”

Glenn Hetrick, who was in charge of special makeup effects, bolstered Jones’ natural talent with some innovative prosthetics to complete the transformation from man to supernatural phenomenon. “We didn’t try to make him Mr. Fantastic,” says Hetrick. “We wanted to convey that he was supernatural in a way that will hopefully be very disturbing for audiences when they see it. It should be an iconic piece of film villainy for everyone to enjoy.”

As menacing as the character is, Jones says he developed a good deal of affection for him. “When you meet the ice cream man, you think, well, there’s an unassuming looking fellow,” says the actor. “And then you tilt your head and realize something’s not quite right about him. And that’s kind of how people react to me in real life. I walk into the room and there’s a nice tall, skinny fellow, but something’s not right about him.”

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Legion – TV Spot – Ice Cream

Posted by LiveFor on January 6, 2010

more about "Legion TV Spot – Ice Cream", posted with vodpod

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Priest – Official one-sheet for the Vampire Western type film

Posted by LiveFor on December 22, 2009

This image has been knocking around for a while, but it is now released as the official poster for the post-apocalytpic film, Priest. As you can tell it stars Paul Bettany as well as Cam Gigandet.

It is due out on 20th August 2010.

Source: STYD

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Creation – Canadian Poster

Posted by LiveFor on December 9, 2009

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Legion TV Spot – Gladys

Posted by LiveFor on November 26, 2009

A little snippet of a creepy old lady from the Angels at war film, Legion. It stars Paul Bettany, Dennis Quaid, Tyrese Gibson and Doug Jones amongst others.

Out on 22 January 2010.

more about "Legion TV Spot – Gladys", posted with vodpod

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Preacher – Could John Cusack be Jesse Custer?

Posted by LiveFor on November 6, 2009

preacher-cassidy1In a recent interview with io9 John Cusack got chatting about a film based on a comic that he wanted to be involved with.

“It’s a vampire and a killer, and they’re on the road, and it’s this really strange story,” said Cusack.

Now Preacher by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon features Jesse Custer (who would be the priest) and Cassidy (an Irish Vampire) along with Tulip, Arse-Face, John Wayne (Bruce Campbell should play him in the film), Herr Starr and too many other twisted characters to mention.

If you’ve read the comics you will know how good they are. However, I never really picture Cusack as either JC or Cassidy.

Asked whether it Preacher he was thinking of, Cusack said, “I think it might have been ‘Preacher,’” and added that he was “trying to” get involved with the long-in-development project.

The actor, who’s appearing in theaters next weekend in the disaster flick “2012,” said he’s most interested one of the two leads, “either the vampire or the priest.”

“One of those two guys,” he said.

Last I heard about the Preacher film was that Sam Mendes was down to direct it but they were waiting for a workable script – like many others I wish it would be a series on HBO to get the full story.

Mind you maybe he is thinking of Priest which also involves priests and vampires, but that’s already started filming with Paul Bettany in the lead.

Do you think John Cusack was talking about Preacher? Would he be good in either of the roles? If not him then who would?

Now if they could get Clint Eastwood involved as the Saint of Killers.

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Legion – Character posters for the Angels at war film

Posted by LiveFor on October 16, 2009

legion6
Check out these cool posters for the people fighting the Apocalypse film with only one Archangel to help them film, Legion.

Check out the trailer if you haven’t already seen it.
legion4
It stars Paul Bettany, Dennis Quaid, Tyrese Gibson, Doug Jones, Jon Tenney, Charles S. Dutton, Lucas Black, Kate Walsh, Adrianne Palicki, Kevin Durand, Willa Holland and is due out on 22nd January 2010.
legion5legion3legion2legion1
Source: MovieWeb

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