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Posts Tagged ‘Frost Nixon’

Michael Sheen as Blofeld? Throw me a frickkin’ bone here

Posted by LiveFor on June 17, 2009

Last week a press release went round saying that James Bond 23 had a new screenwriter in Peter Morgan.

According to The Guardian, actor Michael Sheen is in negotiations to portray the villain in Bond 23.

Sheen would portray Ernst Stavro Blofeld, a Bond villain who has appeared in six previous Bond films and he’s been portrayed by actors such as Donald Pleasance, Telly Sevales, Charles Grey and the villain was also the inspiration for Dr. Evil in the Austin Powers film series.

Sheen has previously worked with the new Bond 23 writer Peter Morgan in several films, including The Queen, The Last King of Scotland, last year’s Best Picture nominee Frost/Nixon and The Damned United. Plus he was a werewolf in the Underworld films so he does have a bit of a range.

Now as a scriptwriter has only been announced I seriously doubt that they have got as far as casting. However, Sheen is a top actor (although I always see a bit of Tony Blair in him) and would be good at grounding the Blofeld character in the slightly more realistic Bond Universe that has been shown in the Daniel Craig era.

I still think they should set up the Bond name as an ID given to all 007 agents which would make it so much easier for all future updates to the franchise and they could do the same with Blofeld. Have the name given to all leaders of SPECTRE.

What do you think of the rumour? Would Sheen make a good Blofeld?

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Bond 23 has The Queen and Frost/Nixon screenwriter attached

Posted by LiveFor on June 12, 2009


Some interesting news regarding the next James Bond film has come to light via AICN

MORGAN, PURVIS & WADE TO WORK ON BOND, JAMES BOND


LOS ANGELES, CA June 12, 2009 – Producers Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli of EON Productions Ltd and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures have today announced that Peter Morgan (Frost/Nixon, The Queen), Neal Purvis and Robert Wade (Quantum of Solace, Casino Royale) will be the screenwriters of the 23rd James Bond adventure.

Daniel Craig will reprise his role as Ian Fleming’s James Bond 007 in the film, which will be a MGM release of an EON production. Bond 23 is the latest installment in the longest-running franchise in motion picture history and will be produced by Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli. A date for the start of production is yet to be confirmed.
 
 “Peter, Neal and Robert are extraordinarily talented and we’re looking forward to working with the three of them,” commented Wilson and Broccoli.

 Peter Morgan is the award-winning writer of such films as The Last King of Scotland, The Queen and Frost/Nixon, which was based on his play. He has also scripted the upcoming The Special Relationship for HBO and Hereafter for DreamWorks. He will turn his attention to Bond 23 on completion of these duties. Morgan is represented by UTA (US) and Independent Talent Group (UK).
 
Since 1991 Neal Purvis and Robert Wade have collaborated on a diverse range of projects including The Italian Job, Johnny English and the past four Bond films. They recently adapted John Le Carre’s The Mission Song and are also working on the upcoming sequel The Brazilian Job. Purvis and Wade are represented by Endeavor (US), Casarotto Ramsay & Associates (UK).


Now I loved Casino Royale but was left disappointed with Quantum of Solace. Hopefully, having a great writer like Morgan onboard means the next Bond (rumoured to be set in Afghanistan) will be another fine addition.

Do you think Morgan will write a good Bond film? What or who do you want to see in it?

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Frost/Nixon, 2008 – Movie Review

Posted by LiveFor on March 17, 2009

Director: Ron Howard
Starring: Frank Langella, Michael Sheen, Kevin Bacon, Sam Rockwell, Rebecca Hall, Matthew Macfadyen, Oliver Platt, Toby Jones.
Running Time: 122 minutes
Score: 8 / 10

This excellent review is by Sarah Louise Dean.

(Warning: Minor Spoiler Alert)

When reading the cast list for certain films, you might find you doing the same thing I do. I can’t help but make judgments regarding the film’s credibility and its plot, before even the first words have been uttered. Looking at the cast here, you already know it’s top-notch. You see that Ron Howard is the Director, so you know that noone is going to be allowed to drop the ball. You may also have some prior knowledge about the Frost/Nixon interviews which lend the film its central theme. You are aware that David Frost, the celebrated but seemingly lightweight comic/interviewer needs to score a high profile interview to facilitate his way back into the favour at the BBC and in the US. You know all about Watergate and you wonder why Richard Nixon would agree to such an interview. You may know that the film is based on a play, so you imagine it might have that same stilted feel – limited scenes in a few locations, and an emphasis on language over imagery. You might even feel a little disheartened, assuming that this might be a bit worthy and over-intellectualised with its focus on events that occurred when the majority of today’s filmgoers were very young. In fact maybe you’ve nearly talked yourself out of seeing the film, its not contemporary, its not what you’d normally see and it might be, heaven forbid, a bit…..dull.

I say STOP! Give yourself a shake and watch the film because it is an absolute delight. This is one of those films that is filled with the unexpected by opening up a ponderous stage play about a story we all think we know, and giving it the wings that only visual imagery on the big screen (and a bigger budget) can provide. I found Frost/Nixon mesmerising.

I will say this though, you must persevere. Ron Howard understands that we may not fully understand the characters intentions and therefore provides us with a lengthy first section. He wants the viewer to fall into the trap of categorising Nixon as a washed and derided figure and Frost as a frivolous underdog. But then you are introduced to James Reston Jr (played with flair by Sam Rockwell) a passionate anti-Nixon biographer who believes the American public deserve an admission of Nixon’s culpability, and Jack Brennan, (an assured turn by Kevin Bacon) an ex-military right-hand man with a voice of reason who fundamentally believes that certain practices are perfectly necessary for the good of people. Brennan is a deadly serious force in a world filled with unholy camaraderie. The period detail is fantastic, seen in the seventies hotel suite décor, the tailoring and riotously, the hairstyles (particularly Matthew Macfadyen very much enjoying John Birt’s shaggy hair) and highlighted by Nixon’s obsession with Frost’s Italian loafers. The action (no car chases and explosions of course) effortlessly flicks between Australia, London and LA, and the playing out of the four key interviews of foreign policy, domestic policy, personal life and Watergate is interspersed with behind-the-scenes style footage allowing each character to escape from their caricature. It’s a good move, giving this film to Ron Howard, placing delicate material in such a capable pair of American hands.

Of course, this film has flaws. It is neither controversial nor particularly hard-hitting, and female characters are given short shrift. Rebecca Hall is woefully underutilised even though she gets the best lines outside of Nixon. However the screenplay expertly expands on an important moment of history making it both entertaining and far more relevant, than you’d initially conceive. The film asks some important questions. Can the media provide us with something from our politicians that Government can’t provide? Can Trial by Media sometimes be the only option left and the best way forward? Peter Morgan, expanding on his celebrated play, allows Brennan and Reston Jr provide the storyline with its heart, as two characters on either side of the divide but both feeling with absolute certainty that they are in the right and the world should know so.

Plaudits for Frank Langella have naturally come flooding in. Yes he effortlessly deals with the sizeable task of taking someone morally corrupt and giving them some much needed three dimensionality, making him look savvy, unflinching and erudite. But he is ably counterbalanced by Michael Sheen’s brilliant performance. Frost almost makes the most interesting viewing. He is the ultimate playful playboy for the majority of the film but as he suffers Nixon’s punch after verbal punch, his discomfort is tangible. We may all know what was coming, but the film in its denouement, is masterful. You come to care for the playboy and you realise how he has stretched himself to pull off this coup, moments before the limelight passes. And Nixon’s late night, inebriated phone call sets up the power struggle of the Watergate discussions with meticulous genius. You want to feel Frost’s gratification at extracting a small apology, but more importantly, you see Nixon’s own epiphany as to his responsibility for his own downfall, and his realisation as to what he has lost.

To feel sympathy for someone so ravaged by power is testament to the sheer brilliance of Howard’s light touch. A wonderful film.

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Oscars 2009 – Best Picture Profanity Reel

Posted by LiveFor on February 22, 2009

All five movies nominated for a Best Picture Oscar re-cut to their profanity reels. Now combined in one video. Definitely contains spoilers…

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USA Network and Universal in 9-Figure Film Deal

Posted by LiveFor on February 9, 2009

USA Network inked a nine-figure deal for the basic cable and broadcast premiere rights to two dozen of Universal Pictures’ films, including Will Ferrell-led Land of the Lost and Borat sequel Bruno.

The deal, which covers mostly pre-buys of theatricals to be released throughout 2009, could be worth north of $200 million, depending on how the titles perform at the box office. If the slate were to underperform in theaters, the package would cost USA about half that.

Cable deals for theatricals are generally paid on a 10%-13% sliding scale of box office returns, depending on performance. This deal is constructed that way, sources say.

Despite massive job losses nationwide in January 2009, the U.S. box office tally was the best ever for a January: $1.030 billion, according to Media by Numbers. The returns marked a 19% year-to-year increase over 2008.

What’s more, basic cable networks across the board rely heavily on theatricals during the daytime and on weekends, and use them as a platform to lead viewers into original programming, the only genre that tends to outperform theatricals in cable ratings.

“We knew we would have to go in aggressively and pay what it takes to get [the films], and we knew what they wanted to make from it,” says Jane Blaney, executive VP of programming, acquisitions and scheduling for USA.

FX bought the rights to much of Universal’s 2008 slate last year in what the studio claimed was a “groundbreaking deal.” That agreement covered 15 films, and was estimated to be worth about $100 million when it was signed.

In addition to Land of the Lost and Bruno, the USA agreement includes State of Play, with Ben Affleck and Russell Crowe; Duplicity, starring Julia Roberts and Clive Owen; Fast & Furious, with Vin Diesel; Public Enemies, with Johnny Depp; Funny People, with Adam Sandler and Seth Rogen; The Wolfman, starring Benicio Del Toro; and already released titles such as Milk and Frost/Nixon. Other movies in the package star Philip Seymour Hoffman, Matt Damon and Jennifer Aniston.

“This is one of the biggest slate deals that you would see, across the board in term of volume,” says Frances Manfredi, executive VP and general sales manager for cable and non-theatrical sales at NBC Universal Television Distribution. “USA put a killer deal on the table, they were very aggressive, and very wisely aggressive. We think this will serve them very well.”

USA will get to air some of the movies starting in 2010, with most heading to the network in 2011, following a premium cable window on HBO.

Source: B&C
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The British Academy of Film and Television Arts nominations

Posted by LiveFor on January 27, 2009

The BAFTA nominations came out a while back and I thought I had posted them but obviously not. Here they are and appear similar to the Oscar nominations. Check out the award at the bottom as you can vote for your rising star of 2009.

The Orange British Academy Film Awards take place at the Royal Opera House on Sunday 8 February.

BEST FILM
THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON – Kathleen Kennedy, Frank Marshall, Ceán Chaffin
FROST/NIXON – Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Brian Grazer, Ron Howard
MILK – Dan Jinks, Bruce Cohen
THE READER – Anthony Minghella, Sydney Pollack, Donna Gigliotti, Redmond Morris
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE – Christian Colson

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM
HUNGER – Laura Hastings-Smith, Robin Gutch, Steve McQueen, Enda Walsh
IN BRUGES – Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin, Martin McDonagh
MAMMA MIA! – Judy Craymer, Gary Goetzman, Phyllida Lloyd, Catherine Johnson
MAN ON WIRE – Simon Chinn, James Marsh
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE – Christian Colson, Danny Boyle, Simon Beaufoy

THE CARL FOREMAN AWARD
for Special Achievement by a British Director, Writer or Producer for their First Feature Film
SIMON CHINN (Producer) – Man On Wire
JUDY CRAYMER (Producer) – Mamma Mia!
GARTH JENNINGS (Writer) – Son of Rambow
STEVE McQUEEN (Director/Writer) – Hunger
SOLON PAPADOPOULOS, ROY BOULTER (Producers) – Of Time And The City

DIRECTOR
CHANGELING – Clint Eastwood
THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON – David Fincher
FROST/NIXON – Ron Howard
THE READER – Stephen Daldry
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE – Danny Boyle

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
BURN AFTER READING – Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
CHANGELING – J. Michael Straczynski
I’VE LOVED YOU SO LONG – Philippe Claudel
IN BRUGES – Martin McDonagh
MILK – Dustin Lance Black

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON – Eric Roth
FROST/NIXON – Peter Morgan
THE READER – David Hare
REVOLUTIONARY ROAD – Justin Haythe
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE – Simon Beaufoy

FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
THE BAADER MEINHOF COMPLEX – Bernd Eichinger, Uli Edel
GOMORRAH – Domenico Procacci, Matteo Garrone
I’VE LOVED YOU SO LONG – Yves Marmion, Philippe Claudel
PERSEPOLIS – Marc-Antoine Robert, Xavier Rigault, Marjane Satrapi, Vincent Paronnaud
WALTZ WITH BASHIR – Serge Lalou, Gerhard Meixner, Yael Nahlieli, Ari Folman

ANIMATED FILM
PERSEPOLIS – Marjane Satrapi, Vincent Paronnaud
WALL•E – Andrew Stanton
WALTZ WITH BASHIR – Ari Folman

LEADING ACTOR
FRANK LANGELLA – Frost/Nixon
DEV PATEL – Slumdog Millionaire
SEAN PENN – Milk
BRAD PITT – The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
MICKEY ROURKE – The Wrestler

LEADING ACTRESS
ANGELINA JOLIE – Changeling
KRISTIN SCOTT THOMAS – I’ve Loved You So Long
MERYL STREEP – Doubt
KATE WINSLET – The Reader
KATE WINSLET – Revolutionary Road

SUPPORTING ACTOR
ROBERT DOWNEY JR. – Tropic Thunder
BRENDAN GLEESON – In Bruges
PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN – Doubt
HEATH LEDGER – The Dark Knight
BRAD PITT – Burn After Reading

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
AMY ADAMS – Doubt
PENÉLOPE CRUZ – Vicky Cristina Barcelona
FREIDA PINTO – Slumdog Millionaire
TILDA SWINTON – Burn After Reading
MARISA TOMEI – The Wrestler

MUSIC
THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON – Alexandre Desplat
THE DARK KNIGHT – Hans Zimmer, James Newton Howard
MAMMA MIA! – Benny Andersson, Björn Ulvaeus
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE – A. R. Rahman
WALL•E – Thomas Newman

CINEMATOGRAPHY
CHANGELING – Tom Stern
THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON – Claudio Miranda
THE DARK KNIGHT – Wally Pfister
THE READER – Chris Menges, Roger Deakins
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE – Anthony Dod Mantle

EDITING **
CHANGELING – Joel Cox, Gary D. Roach
THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON – Kirk Baxter, Angus Wall
THE DARK KNIGHT – Lee Smith
FROST/NIXON – Mike Hill, Dan Hanley
IN BRUGES – Jon Gregory
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE – Chris Dickens
**As there was a tie in this category there are six nominations

PRODUCTION DESIGN
CHANGELING – James J. Murakami, Gary Fettis
THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON – Donald Graham Burt, Victor J. Zolfo
THE DARK KNIGHT – Nathan Crowley, Peter Lando
REVOLUTIONARY ROAD – Kristi Zea, Debra Schutt
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE – Mark Digby, Michelle Day

COSTUME DESIGN
CHANGELING – Deborah Hopper
THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON – Jacqueline West
THE DARK KNIGHT – Lindy Hemming
THE DUCHESS – Michael O’Connor
REVOLUTIONARY ROAD – Albert Wolsky

SOUND
CHANGELING – Walt Martin, Alan Robert Murray, John Reitz, Gregg Rudloff
THE DARK KNIGHT – Lora Hirschberg, Richard King, Ed Novick, Gary Rizzo
QUANTUM OF SOLACE – Jimmy Boyle, Eddy Joseph, Chris Munro, Mike Prestwood Smith, Mark Taylor
SLUMDOG MILLIONARE – Glenn Freemantle, Resul Pookutty, Richard Pryke, Tom Sayers, Ian Tapp
WALL•E – Ben Burtt, Tom Myers, Michael Semanick, Matthew Wood

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS
THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON – Eric Barba, Craig Barron, – Nathan McGuinness, Edson Williams
THE DARK KNIGHT – Chris Corbould, Nick Davis, Paul Franklin, Tim Webber
INDIANA JONES AND THE KINGDOM OF THE CRYSTAL SKULL – Pablo Helman, Marshall Krasser, Steve Rawlins
IRON MAN – Hal Hickel, Shane Patrick Mahan, John Nelson, Ben Snow
QUANTUM OF SOLACE – Chris Corbould, Kevin Tod Haug

MAKE UP & HAIR
THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON – Jean Black, Colleen Callaghan
THE DARK KNIGHT – Peter Robb-King
THE DUCHESS – Daniel Phillips, Jan Archibald
FROST/NIXON – Edouard Henriques, Kim Santantonio
MILK – Steven E. Anderson, Michael White

SHORT ANIMATION
CODSWALLOP – Greg McLeod, Myles McLeod
VARMINTS – Sue Goffe, Marc Craste
WALLACE AND GROMIT: A MATTER OF LOAF AND DEATH – Steve Pegram, Nick Park, Bob Baker

SHORT FILM
KINGSLAND #1 THE DREAMER – Kate Ogborn, Tony Grisoni
LOVE YOU MORE – Caroline Harvey, Anthony Minghella, Sam Taylor-Wood, Patrick Marber
RALPH – Olivier Kaempfer, Alex Winckler
SEPTEMBER – Stewart le Maréchal, Esther May Campbell
VOYAGE D’AFFAIRES (THE BUSINESS TRIP) – Celine Quideau, Sean Ellis

THE ORANGE RISING STAR AWARD
MICHAEL CERA – Juno, Nick And Norah’s Infinite Playlist
NOEL CLARKE – Kidulthood, Adulthood, Dr Who
MICHAEL FASSBENDER – 300, Hunger, Eden Lake (possible The Sweeney)
REBECCA HALL – Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Frost / Nixon
TOBY KEBBELL – Control, RocknRolla
Vote for your Rising star of 2009

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2009 Oscar Nominations are out

Posted by LiveFor on January 22, 2009

The nominees for the 81st Academy Awards have been announced. Looks rather interesting. No Dark Knight for Best Picture although Heath Ledger gets the nod.However, it is up for Best Editing which is a bit odd as I felt the editing in places was an absolute mess.

The 81st Academy Awards will take place on Sunday, February 22nd at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood with a live airing on ABC starting at 8 PM (EST).

PICTURE
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
Frost/Nixon
Milk
The Reader
Slumdog Millionaire

DIRECTOR
Danny Boyle – Slumdog Millionaire
Stephen Daldry – The Reader
Clint Eastwood – Changeling
David Fincher – The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
Ron Howard – Frost/Nixon

ACTOR
Richard Jenkins – The Visitor
Frank Langella – Frost/Nixon
Sean Penn – Milk
Brad Pitt – The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
Mickey Rourke – The Wrestler

ACTRESS
Anne Hathaway – Rachel Getting Married
Angelina Jolie – Changeling
Melissa Leo – Frozen River
Meryl Streep – Doubt
Kate Winslet – The Reader

SUPPORTING ACTOR
Josh Brolin – Milk
Robert Downey Jr. – Tropic Thunder
Philip Seymour Hoffman – Doubt
Heath Ledger – The Dark Knight
Michael Shannon – Revolutionary Road

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Amy Adams – Doubt
Penelope Cruz – Vicky Cristina Barcelona
Viola Davis – Doubt
Taraji P. Henson – The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
Marisa Tomei – The Wrestler

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Courtney Hunt – Frozen River
Mike Leigh – Happy-Go-Lucky
Martin McDonagh – In Bruges
Dustin Lance Black – Milk
Andrew Stanton & Jim Reardon – Wall-E

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Eric Roth & Robin Swicord – The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
John Patrick Shanley – Doubt
Peter Morgan – Frost/Nixon
David Hare – The Reader
Simon Beaufoy – Slumdog Millionaire

ANIMATED FEATURE
Bolt
Kung Fu Panda
Wall-E

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Der Baader Meinhof Komplex
The Class
Departures
Revanche
Waltz With Bashir

ART DIRECTION
Changeling
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
The Dark Knight
The Duchess
Revolutionary Road

CINEMATOGRAPHY
Tom Stern – Changeling
Claudio Miranda – The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
Wally Pfister – The Dark Knight
Chris Menges & Roger Deakins – The Reader
Anthony Dod Mantle – Slumdog Millionaire

DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
The Betrayal (Nerakhoon)
Encounters at the End of the World
The Garden
Man on Wire
Trouble the Water

DOCUMENTARY SHORT
The Conscience of Nhem En
The Final Inch
Smile Pinki
The Witness – From the Balcony of Room 306

ANIMATED SHORT
La Maison en Petits Cubes
Lavatory – Lovestory
Oktapodi
Presto
This Way Up

LIVE-ACTION SHORT
Auf der Strecke (On the Line)
Manon on the Asphalt
New Boy
The Pig
Spielzeugland (Toyland)

VISUAL EFFECTS
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
The Dark Knight
Iron Man

COSTUME DESIGN
Australia
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
The Duchess
Milk
Revolutionary Road

MAKEUP
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
The Dark Knight
Hellboy II: The Golden Army

FILM EDITING
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
The Dark Knight
Frost/Nixon
Milk
Slumdog Millionaire

SOUND MIXING
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
The Dark Knight
Slumdog Millionaire
Wall-E
Wanted

SOUND EDITING
The Dark Knight
Iron Man
Slumdog Millionaire
Wall-E
Wanted

ORIGINAL SCORE
Alexandre Desplat – The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
James Newton Howard – Defiance
Danny Elfman – Milk
A.R. Rahman – Slumdog Millionaire
Thomas Newman – Wall-E

ORIGINAL SONG
“Down to Earth” from Wall-E
“Jai Ho” from Slumdog Millionaire
“O Saya” from Slumdog Millionaire

I think Slumdog Millionaire will clean up this year. What are your thoughts? Any surprises?

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Edgar Wright’s Top 29 films of 2008

Posted by LiveFor on December 16, 2008

Edgar Wright, director of the excellent Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz has got in on the end of year best films thing by giving his top 29 of 2008. A better mix than many of the same old same old lists that have been doing the rounds. How many of them have you seen?

1 – LET THE RIGHT ONE IN
2 – SYNECDOCHE, NEW YORK
3 – IRON MAN
4 – NOT QUITE HOLLYWOOD: THE WILD, UNTOLD STORY OF OZPLOITATION
5 – MAN ON WIRE
6 – HUNGER
7 – FROST / NIXON
8 – THE DARK KNIGHT
9 – BURN AFTER READING
10 – WALL-E
11 – RACHEL GETTING MARRIED
12 – SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE
13 – HAPPY GO LUCKY
14 – GRAN TORINO
15 – KUNG FU PANDA (IMAX)
16 – REC
17 – CLOVERFIELD
18 – JCVD
19 – SON OF RAMBOW
20 – RAMBO
21 – THE RUINS
22 – HELLBOY II: THE GOLDEN ARMY
23 – THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON
24 – THE FOOT FIST WAY
25 – TROPIC THUNDER
26 – MILK
27 – W.
28 – ZACK AND MIRI MAKE A PORNO
29 – PINEAPPLE EXPRESS
30…

The 2008 RIKI OH award for insane, senseless violence – RAMBO
Runner up – PUNISHER : WAR ZONE

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Oscars – What do you think will win Best Picture

Posted by LiveFor on November 24, 2008

I recently posted the ad that had been taken out to promote The Dark Knight for Best Picture at next years Oscars.

That got me thinking about what could possibly win The Best Picture. On my wanders around the World Wide Web there are a few films that seem to be in the running for Best Picture. They are as follows:

Australia – Nicole and Hugh get it on in the outback.

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button – Brad Pitt ages backwards.

The Dark Knight – Bale growls as The Batman, Ledger does a magic trick and there are two Aaron Eckharts but I didn’t see any jousting.

Doubt – Meryl Streep and Amy Adams are nuns. Is it a porno? Philip Seymore Hoffman wishes.

Frost/Nixon – The head Lycan dude fron Underworld interviews Dracula.

Gran Torino – Clint Eastwood plays a rascist and has a nice car.

Milk – Sean Penn play a big gay bottle of semi-skimmed or a politician or something.

Nothing But the Truth – Kate Beckinsale outs a CIA agent with hilarious consequences.

Rachel Getting Married – Rachel is getting married and her sister does drugs

The Reader – Kate Winslet is a Nazi who likes to have bedtime stories read to her. Ahh isn’t that sweet!

Revolutionary Road – Kate Winslett and Leonardo DiCaprio set sail on the Titanic while living in 1950’s Connecticut and argue a lot or something. I could be wrong. Not sure how Kate got the part in the film directed by her husband? Is Billy Zane in it?

Slumdog Millionaire – Indian kid wins Who Wants to be A Millionaire. Danny Boyle still goes on about 28 Days Later wasn’t a zombie film.

The Wrestler – Mickey Rourke is a washed up has-been. In this film he plays a wrestler.

WALL-E – CGI Pixar fest with a cute little robot.

Sadly I’ve only seen a couple of them (Dark Knight, WALL-E) although a fair few of them have yet to be released so it’s not that bad a thing. I do want to see Benjamin Button, Frost/Nixon, Gran Torino, Milk and The Wrestler and the others I’m all a bit meh about. I personally think Benjamin Button will win the best picture Oscar purely from all the buzz and reviews I’ve been reading about it.

Which film do you see winning Best Picture? How many of the above list have you seen and what are you looking forward to seeing? Which ones will you avoid? What films should be on the list? Will Billy Zane win best actor?

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Moon – On-Set photo, an interview with Sam Rockwell and what influences the director, Duncan Jones

Posted by LiveFor on November 19, 2008

I posted the new poster for Moon earlier today. Now here is a photo from the set of Moon. It shows the film crew being busy, but more interestingly it shows a bit more of the moonbase.

Doing a bit more hunting around the web I have found out that Sam Rockwell plays two characters, one of which is a clone of the other and they both have different personalities.

That could explain the dummy lying down in the bottom right of the photo as it may well be used for scenes where Sam Rockwell has to act against himself..or it may be a robot voiced by Kevin Spacey. I hope it is the former option as it looks like it would make a crap robot. Wonder if it will turn out that Rockwell isn’t actually cloned and is just going mad and talking to his other personality?

I found the photo on Daneeta Loretta’s London Metblog. Apparantly she is mates with the director, Duncan Jones, and says, “My mate and fellow LFS alumni Duncan is in the middle of filming his first feature “Moon” at Shepperton Studios (not technically London, I know, but close enough). Sam Rockwell is in the lead playing a scientist returning to Earth after a three-year sojourn on the Moon.

If you’re interested in Sci-Fi and have a penchant for those classic films of the 70s, this will be the film for you. Duncan’s references are the likes of “Alien” (the original) and “Silent Running.” It won’t be out ’til 2009″

I also came across this interview with Sam Rockwell he did way back in March. He talks about Frost/Nixon, Choke, Snow Angels, Charlies Angels and this is what he had to say about Moon

The A.V. Club: So you’re working in London right now?

Sam Rockwell: I’m in jolly old London. I’m working on a science-fiction movie called Moon. And it’s just me and a robot. That’s it, man. You ever seen a movie called Silent Running with Bruce Dern? It’s sort of like that.

AVC: Or Castaway?

SR: It’s a little bit like Castaway, too, except my character is on the moon and he meets his clone. That’s a little different, too.

AVC: So unless the robot is really charismatic, this is obviously a leading role. Does your mindset change when you’re cast in a lead role rather than a supporting role?

SR: There’s a mixed bag with it. It’s more responsibility, but it’s probably easier to do a lead role, because you just get into a groove, vs. a supporting role, you wait around more.

AVC: That seems to be the difference between an independent film and a studio film too, the waiting around.

SR: Yeah. In independent movies, you wait around less. In a way, it’s a little more creative, I think. For an actor, anyway.

Now we know a little bit more about it. A mix of Silent Running, Castaway, Saturn 3 and a hint of Solaris (the George Clooney version). Regular reader of the site, Tony H put this forward, “For this to be something new it has to have an almighty twist…is he being replaced by his own clone who has orders to kill him first? A corporation that saves on wages and recruitment by growing, implanting and then disposing of the workforce….”

Where do you reckon this film is going?

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