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Posts Tagged ‘Jamie Bell’

Tintin – Spielberg talks about why he went motion-capture

Posted by LiveFor on February 22, 2010

There is a great interview with Steven Spielberg over at the LA Times about his work on the Tintin adaption – The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn.

It stars stars Jamie Bell (Billy Elliot, King Kong) as Tintin, Andy Serkis (The Lord of the Rings, King Kong) as Captain Haddock, Daniel Craig (Casino Royale) as Red Rackham and Nick Frost and Simon Pegg (Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz, Paul) as the Thompson Twins. Peter Jackson is producing it with the animation done by Jackson’s Weta Workshop.

“It was based on my respect for the art of Hergé and wanting to get as close to that art as I could, Hergé wrote about fictional people in a real world, not in a fantasy universe,” Spielberg said. “It was the real universe he was working with, and he used National Geographic to research his adventure stories. It just seemed that live action would be too stylized for an audience to relate to. You’d have to have costumes that are a little outrageous when you see actors wearing them. The costumes seem to fit better when the medium chosen is a digital one.”

They are using the technology from James Cameron’s Avatar so it means that it should look spot on and Spielberg could also watch the action on the digital sets as the actors went through the motions.

“I just adored it,“ he says. “It made me more like a painter than ever before. I got a chance to do so many jobs that I don’t often do as a director. You get to paint with this device that puts you into a virtual world, and allows you to make your shots and block all the actors with a small hand-held device only three times as large as an Xbox game controller.”

“When Captain Haddock runs across the volume, the cameras capture all the information of his physical and emotional moves,” the director said. “So as Andy Serkis runs across the stage, there’s Captain Haddock on the monitor, in full anime, running along the streets of Belgium. Not only are the actors represented in real time, they enter into a three-dimensional world.”

Fingers crossed that they get it spot on as I have fond memories of reading the Tintin books when I was a kid. The film is due out in 2011.

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The Eagle of the Ninth – Photos from the Roman film starring Channing Tatum

Posted by LiveFor on December 30, 2009

Directed by Kevin Macdonald. Starring Channing Tatum, Jamie Bell, Donald Sutherland, Mark Strong and Tahar Rahim, The Eagle of the Ninth is set in the dangerous world of second-century Britain. In 140 AD, twenty years after the unexplained disappearance of the entire Ninth Legion in the mountains of Scotland, young centurion Marcus Aquila (Tatum) arrives from Rome to solve the mystery and restore the reputation of his father, the commander of the Ninth. Accompanied only by his British slave Esca (Bell), Marcus sets out across Hadrian’s Wall into the uncharted highlands of Caledonia – to confront its savage tribes, make peace with his father’s memory, and retrieve the lost legion’s golden emblem, the Eagle of the Ninth.

Source: Movie Web

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The Eagle of the Ninth is shooting

Posted by LiveFor on August 25, 2009

n14340The Eagle of the Ninth has begun shooting in Hungary. No it is not a film about golf. If you like big Roman epics then this could be for you. It is directed by Kevin Macdonald and stars Channing Tatum, Jamie Bell, Donald Sutherland, and Mark Strong.

Filming begins today on the Roman epic adventure The Eagle of the Ninth, directed by Academy Award winner Kevin Macdonald and produced by Duncan Kenworthy. Shooting entirely on location in Hungary and Scotland, the film is co-financed by Film4 with Focus Features, which holds worldwide rights excluding U.K. free-TV.

The cast is headed by Channing Tatum (G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra, the upcoming Dear John), Jamie Bell (Defiance, Jumper), two-time Golden Globe Award winner Donald Sutherland, and Mark Strong (the upcoming Sherlock Holmes and Robin Hood). Mr. Macdonald is reunited on the new film with Jeremy Brock, BAFTA Award-winning screenwriter of his 2006 film The Last King of Scotland, who has adapted the screenplay of The Eagle of the Ninth from Rosemary Sutcliff’s classic novel of the same name.

The Eagle of the Ninth is set in the dangerous world of second-century Britain. In 140 AD, twenty years after the unexplained disappearance of the entire Ninth Legion in the mountains of Scotland, young centurion Marcus Aquila (played by Mr. Tatum) arrives from Rome to solve the mystery and restore the reputation of his father, the commander of the Ninth. Accompanied only by his British slave Esca (Mr. Bell), Marcus sets out across Hadrian’s Wall into the uncharted highlands of Caledonia – to confront its savage tribes, make peace with his father’s memory, and retrieve the lost legion’s golden emblem, the Eagle of the Ninth. Mr. Sutherland portrays Marcus’ uncle Aquila, who has retired in Britain; Mr. Strong is cast as Guern, an ex-soldier who holds crucial information about the Ninth.

Film4 head Tessa Ross added, “We’re incredibly excited to be working again with the wonderful Kevin Macdonald and his brilliant collaborators on this great project – Duncan, Jeremy, and our colleagues at Focus.”

In addition to The Last King of Scotland, for which Forest Whitaker won the Best Actor Academy Award, Mr. Macdonald’s films as director include One Day in September, which won him the Best Documentary Feature Oscar; the mountain-climbing thriller Touching the Void; and, most recently, State of Play, starring Russell Crowe and Ben Affleck.

Duncan Kenworthy has produced three of the most successful British films of all time: Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, and Love Actually. Together, they have grossed nearly $900 million at the worldwide box-office. He has been nominated for a Best Picture Academy Award and three Golden Globe Awards, and has won five BAFTA Awards and three Emmy Awards. He was made an O.B.E. in 1999 for services to film, and is vice president of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). In 2004, he created the Toledo Scholarships at the National Film and Television School for British ethnic minority students; there have been eight Toledo Scholars so far.

Film4, headed by Tessa Ross, is Channel 4 Television’s feature film division. The Company develops and co-finances film productions and is known for working with the most innovative talent in the U.K., whether new or established. Film4 was a financier of Danny Boyle’s Slumdog Millionaire, which won 8 Academy Awards earlier this year. Film4 partnered with Focus on Martin McDonagh’s In Bruges, for which star Colin Farrell won a Golden Globe Award. It also backed Steve McQueen’s Hunger, winner of, amongst other awards, the 2008 Cannes International Film Festival’s Camera d’Or; and Mike Leigh’s Oscar-nominated Happy-Go-Lucky, for which star Sally Hawkins won a Golden Globe Award.

Film4’s most recent releases include Ken Loach’s Looking for Eric and Michael Winterbottom’s Genova. Upcoming Film4 projects include Peter Jackson’s The Lovely Bones; Paul King’s Bunny and the Bull; Sam Taylor Wood’s Nowhere Boy; Mark Romanek’s Never Let Me Go; Xiaolu Guo’s She, A Chinese, which won the Golden Leopard at the 2009 Locarno Film Festival; and, with Focus Features International, and the UK Film Council’s Premiere Fund, Mike Leigh’s new film.

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Tintin news – Daniel Craig is the big bad and Jamie Bell is Tintin

Posted by LiveFor on January 27, 2009


Collider have some news on the Tintin movie.

It’s going to be called The Adventures of Tintin: Secret of the Unicorn.

Jamie Bell (Billy Elliot, King Kong) will be playing Tintin after Thomas Sangster dropped out.

Daniel Craig will be playing the nefarious “Red Rackham”. Craig previously worked with producer and director of the first Tintin film Steven Spielberg on Munich.

The film will co-star Andy Serkis, Simon Pegg, Nick Frost, Gad Elmaleh, Toby Jones and Mackenzie Crook. All will be doing the motion capture dance.

Finally the script is being writtern by Edgar Wright (Spaced, Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz), Steven Moffat (Dr Who, Press Gang) and Joe Cornish (Adam & Joe).

All in all good news for the Tintin film.

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Defiance, 2008 – Movie Review

Posted by LiveFor on January 15, 2009


Director: Edward Zwick
Starring: Daniel Craig, Liev Schreiber, Jamie Bell
Running Time: 137 minutes
Score: 7 / 10

This review by RevSykes – May contain spoilers.

Edward Zwick is an idealistic filmmaker. My favorites of his are Glory and Blood Diamond. Last Samurai not so much. He wrote an article in the New York Times Magazine last week stating that he was attracted to the book Defiance because it portrayed Jews of WWII not as victims, as is so common. Like many Jews (see “Tough Jews” by Rich Cohen) he romanticizes the Jewish gangster connections of earlier generations of Jewish immigrants, and sees in them the protagonists that the victims of the Holocaust weren’t.

Fair enough, or, should I say, not fair at all, since I do not share the view that the civilian Jews of Europe were passive because they could not defeat or evade the German military and local death squads. Why is this relevant to “Defiance?” Because Zwick let his bias affect what he chose to portray in the historical drama of “Defiance.” There is a brief shot of the bodies left behind of the mass killings of Jews in what was then Russia in 1941 (long forgotten in the East until Yevvtushenko’s “Babi Yar” of 1961). I think that one of the reasons (more below) that “Defiance” is not nearly as powerful as “Schindler’s List” is that Zwick was unwilling to portray the grotesque drama of the massacres that happened in Byelorussia in 1941 because, to him, it made Jews look like victims. It’s all referred to off-screen. “Schindler’s List” punches you in the stomach with the vivid depiction of the concentration camps and crematoria — historical truths — and it makes Schindler’s story of saving his workers into an epic. So could “Defiance” have been. Maybe the Bielieskis’ story is not as heroic as Schindler’s, but I don’t think so. Theirs is probably more so (though different of course — Schindler wasn’t facing a direct murderous threat). If Zwick had put his movie in the proper historical framework (I’m not talking about gratuitous violence, which would, anyway, be hard to achieve given the reality of what the Germans did to civilians) the story of the Bieleskis saving 1200 Jews would have had some of the impact of Schindler’s story of saving the Jewish workers on his list.

My second critique is poor character development of the Daniel Craig character. Yes, he’s aggrieved over what degree of vengeful violence against the Germans is necessary or appropriate. He starts off an aggressive killer and then pulls back, becoming (aided by the prolonged bout of typhus) quite passive. We can call the Craig character “complex” or “conflicted,” but there is very little context to explain him. Schreiber’s character is perhaps more “on the nose,” but it is understandable, both to us and to Schreiber, who does a good job with it. Craig’s character, to me, is a series of events, not a character.

The joining theme of these ideas is the problem of historical cinema when you want to get the benefit of “based on a true story,” at the front of your film. We know this is a very, very broad term. Clint Eastwood left out the killer’s mother, who was totally involved in the action in reality, when he dramatized, “The Changeling.” Did Schreiber and his colleagues show up at the very last second and disarm a German tank when Craig was the only one left standing to defend the Jews? Unlikely. So Zwick messed with the military history, as is necessary in a Hollywood movie. But did he feel constrained by the true characters of the brothers? Or, worse, did he feel constrained as to what he could make of those characters because of the need to portray them as heroic? I would argue the opposite. Zwick described the brothers as “sexually predacious” in his NYT article. But, in the movie, they appear to be pretty much gentlemen (Schreiber leaving his “forest wife” to join with the Red Army isn’t much of a mark against him). If the characters had been more vivid, including more negative, I think their “heroism” would have been more dramatic.

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Defiance, 2008 – Movie Review

Posted by LiveFor on January 15, 2009


Director: Edward Zwick
Starring: Daniel Craig, Liev Schreiber, Jamie Bell
Running Time: 137 minutes
Score: 7 / 10

This review by RevSykes – May contain spoilers.

Edward Zwick is an idealistic filmmaker. My favorites of his are Glory and Blood Diamond. Last Samurai not so much. He wrote an article in the New York Times Magazine last week stating that he was attracted to the book Defiance because it portrayed Jews of WWII not as victims, as is so common. Like many Jews (see “Tough Jews” by Rich Cohen) he romanticizes the Jewish gangster connections of earlier generations of Jewish immigrants, and sees in them the protagonists that the victims of the Holocaust weren’t.

Fair enough, or, should I say, not fair at all, since I do not share the view that the civilian Jews of Europe were passive because they could not defeat or evade the German military and local death squads. Why is this relevant to “Defiance?” Because Zwick let his bias affect what he chose to portray in the historical drama of “Defiance.” There is a brief shot of the bodies left behind of the mass killings of Jews in what was then Russia in 1941 (long forgotten in the East until Yevvtushenko’s “Babi Yar” of 1961). I think that one of the reasons (more below) that “Defiance” is not nearly as powerful as “Schindler’s List” is that Zwick was unwilling to portray the grotesque drama of the massacres that happened in Byelorussia in 1941 because, to him, it made Jews look like victims. It’s all referred to off-screen. “Schindler’s List” punches you in the stomach with the vivid depiction of the concentration camps and crematoria — historical truths — and it makes Schindler’s story of saving his workers into an epic. So could “Defiance” have been. Maybe the Bielieskis’ story is not as heroic as Schindler’s, but I don’t think so. Theirs is probably more so (though different of course — Schindler wasn’t facing a direct murderous threat). If Zwick had put his movie in the proper historical framework (I’m not talking about gratuitous violence, which would, anyway, be hard to achieve given the reality of what the Germans did to civilians) the story of the Bieleskis saving 1200 Jews would have had some of the impact of Schindler’s story of saving the Jewish workers on his list.

My second critique is poor character development of the Daniel Craig character. Yes, he’s aggrieved over what degree of vengeful violence against the Germans is necessary or appropriate. He starts off an aggressive killer and then pulls back, becoming (aided by the prolonged bout of typhus) quite passive. We can call the Craig character “complex” or “conflicted,” but there is very little context to explain him. Schreiber’s character is perhaps more “on the nose,” but it is understandable, both to us and to Schreiber, who does a good job with it. Craig’s character, to me, is a series of events, not a character.

The joining theme of these ideas is the problem of historical cinema when you want to get the benefit of “based on a true story,” at the front of your film. We know this is a very, very broad term. Clint Eastwood left out the killer’s mother, who was totally involved in the action in reality, when he dramatized, “The Changeling.” Did Schreiber and his colleagues show up at the very last second and disarm a German tank when Craig was the only one left standing to defend the Jews? Unlikely. So Zwick messed with the military history, as is necessary in a Hollywood movie. But did he feel constrained by the true characters of the brothers? Or, worse, did he feel constrained as to what he could make of those characters because of the need to portray them as heroic? I would argue the opposite. Zwick described the brothers as “sexually predacious” in his NYT article. But, in the movie, they appear to be pretty much gentlemen (Schreiber leaving his “forest wife” to join with the Red Army isn’t much of a mark against him). If the characters had been more vivid, including more negative, I think their “heroism” would have been more dramatic.

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Defiance – Daniel Craig fights the Nazis.

Posted by LiveFor on October 10, 2008

Based on an extraordinary true story, DEFIANCE is an epic tale of family, honor, vengeance and salvation in World War II. The year is 1941 and the Jews of Eastern Europe are being massacred by the thousands. Managing to escape certain death, three brothers take refuge in the dense surrounding woods they have known since childhood. There they begin their desperate battle against the Nazis. Daniel Craig, Liev Schreiber and Jamie Bell star as brothers who turn a primitive struggle to survive into something far more consequential – a way to avenge the deaths of their loved ones by saving thousands of others.

At first it is all they can do to stay alive. But gradually, as whispers of their daring spreads, they begin to attract others – men and women, young and old – willing to risk everything for the sake of even a moment’s freedom. Tuvia (CRAIG) is a reluctant leader and his decisions are challenged by his brother, Zus (SCHREIBER) who worries that Tuvia’s idealistic plans will doom them all. Asael (BELL) is the youngest – caught between his brothers’ fierce rivalry. As a brutal winter descends, they work to create a community, and to keep faith alive when all humanity appeared to be lost.

DEFIANCE is directed by Edward Zwick (BLOOD DIAMOND, GLORY) from a screenplay by Zwick and Clay Frohman, based on Nechama Tec’s non-fiction book of the same name. The producers are Zwick and Pieter Jan Brugge. The team recreating the forest haven includes two-time Oscar®-nominated cinematographer Eduardo Serra (BLOOD DIAMOND, GIRL WITH A PEARL EARRING), production designer Dan Weil (BLOOD DIAMOND, THE BOURNE IDENTITY) and Oscar®-winning costume designer Jenny Beavan (GOSFORD PARK, A ROOM WITH A VIEW).

Defiance is out somewhere in the World on December 12th 2008.

What do you think of the trailer?
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