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Legion – News on how the cast of the Angels at War film came to pass

Posted by LiveFor on February 16, 2010


A dusty diner in the Mojave Desert becomes ground zero for earth’s final showdown in Legion, a startlingly original and terrifying vision of the Apocalypse from director and writer Scott Stewart (Priest). As mankind destroys itself in a savage fury, a small group of people trapped on the edge of nowhere prepare to make a last stand—with the help of a mysterious and powerful stranger.

Unaware of the chaos unfolding around the globe, Bob Hanson (Dennis Quaid), the owner of a remote roadside café, and his partner Percy (Charles S. Dutton) go about business as usual. The restaurant’s beautiful and very pregnant waitress, Charlie (Adrianne Palicki), serves breakfast to Sandra and Howard, a well-heeled suburban couple (Kate Walsh and Jon Tenney) and their teenage daughter Audrey (Willa Holland), as they wait for their car to be repaired by Bob’s son, Jeep (Lucas Black).

When the television goes on the fritz and the phones go out, the group realizes they have lost all communication with the outside world. As they attempt to make sense of what’s happening—An earthquake? A terrorist attack?— an elderly woman (Jeannette Miller) arrives and sweetly orders a steak from Charlie. When her meal arrives, she begins spewing shocking obscenities. In a heartbeat, the fragile old lady develops superhuman strength, launching a grisly attack that leaves Howard critically injured.

A desperate attempt to get medical help ends when an impenetrable cloud of flying insects turns the diner into the only safe haven for miles. As the horrifying truth of their situation sinks in, a stranger (Paul Bettany) joins them with an arsenal of stolen weapons. He informs Charlie that her unborn baby is now humanity’s only hope, and he’s willing to do whatever it takes to save it.

The world is about to become a waking nightmare for the last remnants of mankind as rolling caravans of crazed killers arrive in search of fresh victims and an army of warrior angels bent on total destruction follows close behind them in a unique and terrifying glimpse of the End of Days.

Director Scott Stewart and Producer David Lancaster agreed from the beginning that in order for Legion to fulfill its potential as a character-driven action-thriller with supernatural themes, it would require an outstanding, highly committed cast. “The most important decisions a director makes are in casting a film,” says Stewart. “If you cast it right, so much is going your way from the start. To that end, Rick Montgomery, our casting director, was absolutely fearless. He understood that we were trying to aim high and defy expectations with the casting of the movie.”

The filmmakers succeeded in bringing together a first-rate cast that includes award-winning actors from both sides of the Atlantic. “We have the dream-come-true cast,” says Stewart. “It was so important to get these actors. We spend the whole movie locked in a diner with them, so the audience has to care about them. There are no disposable stock characters; everybody is there for a specific reason.”

The catalyst for the action of the film is Michael, a larger-than-life figure who seems to appear out of nowhere. “Michael has such conviction that the other characters follow him without question,” says Stewart. “I didn’t want him to be an enigma. He is the Archangel Michael, but you can’t play that abstraction.”

Paul Bettany, perhaps best known for his powerful performance as Silas in The Da Vinci Code, is a highly respected British actor who has worked with the Royal Shakespeare Company. Convincing him to play Michael seemed an audacious goal for the filmmakers. “Paul has the authority we needed, but given his pedigree, we weren’t sure he would be interested,” says Stewart.

Stewart had planned his presentation meticulously in an all-out effort to capture Bettany’s imagination. The actor was as intrigued by Stewart’s vision as he was by the film’s premise. “Scott pitched his movie better than anybody has ever pitched a movie to me before,” the actor says. “He had all kinds of visual aids. He’s a very impressive human being. There were rumors going around the set he went through Harvard and M.I.T. and Cambridge and Oxford by the time he was nineteen.”

The unusual thematic elements were icing on the cake for the actor. “It’s a really slick, fast-paced movie that is in no way stupid,” he says. “Traditionally Michael is the defender of mankind. He is known as the first in all heaven to bow down before mankind and he still has faith in humanity despite all the war and horror he sees. So he’s having a massive crisis of allegiance.”

Bettany’s unique qualities as an actor made him an ideal choice to play the conflicted archangel, says the director. “Paul has an incredible stillness that only the greatest actors possess. His work is almost surgical in its exactness and specificity. That helped make Michael a commanding, mysterious figure you immediately trust, even if you don’t fully understand why. He turned out to be the most tremendous partner a filmmaker could have, because he cared a lot about the film and about his character—but he also wanted to shoot a machine gun and have a good time.”

Having Bettany on board sent a message to the film community about the project. “It said that we were up to something very different,” says Stewart. “His presence made it easy to attract other high-caliber actors.”

Dennis Quaid, who plays Bob Hansen, the diner’s owner was one of the first to join Bettany. Quaid has been a popular leading man for more than 30 years, winning praise for performances in projects ranging from the 1979 classic Breaking Away to the recent summer blockbuster G.I Joe: Rise of the Cobra. But Stewart believes Quaid’s reputation as a movie star sometimes obscures his acting ability. “Because he’s been such a big star for so long, I think some people take his talent for granted,” says the director. “That’s a mistake. He’s incredibly entertaining to watch. And in Legion, he is able to play totally against type. Audiences are so used to him playing heroic characters that it will be a surprise to see him as Bob, a man who has taken several wrong turns in his life and lived to regret it. And he brought his crackerjack comic timing as well. There are some humorous moments in the script and Dennis made them all work.”

The opportunity to work with this cast was a major selling point for Quaid. “Working with really good actors makes you better,” he says. “With the emphasis that Scott put on creating realistic, three-dimensional people, we could really kick ass as far as where we went with our characters.”

Quaid was also drawn to the script’s deft mixture of high-octane thrills and serious undertones. “The story really has resonance,” he adds. “And at the same time, it’s very entertaining and a great action movie. Scott Stewart came up an original twist on the Biblical apocalypse.”

Quaid’s presence raised the film’s profile yet another notch, says Lancaster. “He immediately understood what we were trying to do. He would never just do a generic action-horror movie. What he and Paul both recognized was the opportunity to appeal to a wider audience. These are really fine actors who engaged in this because they see it as something special.”

Michael has come to the diner to find Charlie, a young, pregnant waitress he believes will figure prominently in the future of humankind. “We searched long and hard for an actress to play that key character before we found Adrianne Palicki,” says Lancaster. “Charlie is a girl from the wrong side of the tracks; she’s is pregnant, but doesn’t know who the father is, and has struggled with whether to keep her baby or give it up for adoption. Adrianne captured all of that in her performance.”

Stewart was initially unfamiliar with the actress’ work, but was immediately impressed by her authenticity. “She is not a Hollywood type,” he says. “She’s from Ohio and she brings a grounded realism to her work. And she’s also gorgeous in a very approachable way.”

For Palicki, one of the stars of the critically acclaimed television drama “Friday Night Lights,” the character of Charlie sealed the deal. “First and foremost, she was fantastic to play,” says the actress. “It’s one of the best female roles in my age group that I’ve seen and to be able embody such a strong, intricate character was very satisfying.

“In fact, every character in this movie has a strong arc,” she adds. “Every single person is trying to find their path. Scott was really great about letting me find my own voice. He was adamant about what he wanted, but he also did such a great job of letting us discover our characters for ourselves.”

Palicki was apprehensive about one scene in particular. “The childbirth scene was maybe the scariest thing I’ve ever done as an actor,” she admits. “I had a panic attack the day before we shot it, but there were plenty of women who supported me through that.”

The filmmakers were looking for a young actor who would embody honesty and integrity for the role of Jeep Hansen, Bob’s son and Charlie’s protector, when they met with Lucas Black. “With Lucas, what you see is what you get,” says Stewart. “He grew up in Alabama and now lives in Missouri. So he’s not a Hollywood-type guy and it shows in how real he is as Jeep.”

Black, who was barely a teenager when he starred opposite Billy Bob Thornton in Slingblade, was drawn to the script by Jeep’s journey over the course of the film. “He starts out as someone who pretty much keeps to himself, until Michael comes along and becomes a kind of mentor,” observes Black.

Black was also thrilled by the opportunity to work with an actor whose work he has admired for years. “Dennis Quaid is awesome,” he says. “Our father and son moments really fell into place. The real relationships between the characters bring a sense of realism to all the action—and there’s tons of it.”

The Biblical themes were very familiar to Black, who was raised a Southern Baptist in Alabama. “There’s some deep stuff in this movie,” he says. “Scott has put a really interesting twist on it that I think is going to interest a lot of people and create a lot of buzz.”

Bob’s partner in the diner, Percy, is played by Charles S. Dutton, a three-time Emmy® winner who has moved effortlessly between film, stage and television during a career that includes a recent appearance in Fame, as well as leading roles for acclaimed directors Robert Altman (Cookie’s Fortune) and John Sayles (Honeydripper). Stewart calls the actor “a force of nature.” “Charles has a great deal of integrity and maturity,” he says. “It’s awesome to have him in a genre film, because he really makes you believe the reality of any situation. When his character believes something in a film, no matter how fantastic, the audience believes it too.”

Dutton also brings a gravitas to his scenes, adds Lancaster. “He grasped the concept immediately,” says the producer. “Charles was able to speak very fluently about the fact that his character reads and studies the Bible. He responded strongly to the fact that a person of faith could identify with this movie.”

In fact, Percy’s uncomplicated faith was central to Dutton’s understanding of the character. “He says he knew this day was coming, he just didn’t think it would be in his lifetime,” points out Dutton. “He’s the only one willing to say a prayer, the only one willing to believe what’s occurring.”

Stewart’s script provided Dutton with a clear road map throughout the production, says the actor. “The characters are so well written that you immediately knew where you were. You didn’t have to ask a thousand questions. You just had to try to make each scene as emotionally believable as you could. And when you add it all up, you discover it’s the Apocalypse. The beauty of the script to me is that this bunch of misfits has to save the world. It’s audacious.”

But audiences needn’t take all of that too seriously, he adds. The film has a great deal of fun to offer as well. “It’s also a good old-fashioned horror film,” he says. “We’re trying to scare the hell out of audiences. I call it a three-pronged joy ride. It’ scary, it’s funny and it gives you something to think about.”

The director was also unaware of “Grey’s Anatomy’s” Kate Walsh before she auditioned for the role of Sandra. “I’m not a big TV watcher,” he confesses. “But the moment she came in, I knew I would never find a better actor to play Sandra. She was unafraid to go to a very dark place with the character.”

Lancaster says he was extremely excited Kate Walsh agreed to play Sandra, an upscale suburbanite trying to keep her daughter out of harm’s way, without much success. “I can’t think of a more interesting actress working in television right now than Kate,” says Lancaster. “She’s sexy and fun. She brought so much to that role and worked so well with Jon Tenney, who plays her husband, Howard.”

Walsh was won over by the script’s combination of well-defined characters and action. “There’s so much action in this movie and the circumstances are so extreme,” she says. “But it’s not only a great action story, it’s also a supernatural thriller and a love story. It has everything: birth, life, death. It’s very dense and very exciting.”

“When I read the script, I was terrified,” she admits. “I think the audience will be too. But there’s also great humor in it. That’s one of the best qualities of Scott’s writing. Everybody has some great kind of zingers.”

Willa Holland, who plays Howard and Sandra’s daughter Audrey, is familiar to television audiences as Kaitlin Cooper of “The O.C.” She says her character is different from most of the roles written for teens. “You get typecast as a teenager,” she says. “You can only get to a few different places. Audrey goes from the rebellious teenager to being her mother’s mother, and then being the savior of mankind.”

Holland confesses she has never seen a horror movie. “I’m deathly afraid of seeing scary movies,” she admits. “I get too freaked out. But I’m going to go to the theater for this one just to watch people’s reactions. “

The contingent trapped in the diner is completed by Kyle Williams, a divorced father trying to get to Los Angeles for a custody hearing. The filmmakers were happy to find Tyrese Gibson, one of the stars of the Transformer franchise and a Grammy winning recording artist, for the role. “Tyrese brings a clearly defined, through-line to his work,” says Lancaster. “He’s such a wonderful actor with so much presence that you just can’t take your eyes off of him. When he’s on screen, he fills it up.”

Michael’s nemesis in the film is also his brother, Gabriel, an archangel traditionally portrayed as God’s messenger and as the most faithful of His creations. A one-time ballet dancer who stands six feet, six inches tall, actor Kevin Durand brings both brawn and grace to the character. “Kevin is so compelling,” says Lancaster. “He moves beautifully but also has this incredibly menacing feeling about him.”

The filmmakers were impressed by Durand’s recent performances in X-Men Origins: Wolverine and as the cold-blooded mercenary Martin Keamy on the hit television series “Lost.” “We wanted somebody who could hold his own with Paul Bettany, who’s an imposing actor,” says Stewart. “Kevin has this awesome physical presence, and he backs it up with serious acting chops. He’s really a character actor inside the body of a major action star. What could be better than that?”

Legion appealed to Durand on a primal level, he says. “Gabriel is being sent to do God’s work, but in a way I don’t think we’ve ever seen before—by any means necessary.”

The through-line for the climactic confrontation between the two archangels could be called sibling rivalry taken to a cosmic extreme. “Paul and I played it like we were brothers who were always vying for the attention and love of their father,” says Durand. “Michael was the one who got most of the love, without having to abide by the rules. Gabriel always went by the book and never got the attention he thought he deserved. This battle comes down to eons of competition.”

The filmmakers secured the legendary character actor Doug Jones for an astonishing cameo. Jones, who played Abe Sapien in the Hellboy movies, as well as the Faun in Pan’s Labyrinth, embodies all that is terrifying in this film as an ice cream man in the throes of a dreadful transformation. And he may just be the most flexible man on the planet. “He’s incredible,” says Stewart. “I understand why Guillermo del Toro likes him so much. He’s a great actor, but he’s also the Cirque de Soleil of actors. He’s so elastic and expressive in his face and he can do things that you would normally think you’d need prosthetics for.”

Glenn Hetrick, who was in charge of special makeup effects, bolstered Jones’ natural talent with some innovative prosthetics to complete the transformation from man to supernatural phenomenon. “We didn’t try to make him Mr. Fantastic,” says Hetrick. “We wanted to convey that he was supernatural in a way that will hopefully be very disturbing for audiences when they see it. It should be an iconic piece of film villainy for everyone to enjoy.”

As menacing as the character is, Jones says he developed a good deal of affection for him. “When you meet the ice cream man, you think, well, there’s an unassuming looking fellow,” says the actor. “And then you tilt your head and realize something’s not quite right about him. And that’s kind of how people react to me in real life. I walk into the room and there’s a nice tall, skinny fellow, but something’s not right about him.”

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Legion – Character posters for the Angels at war film

Posted by LiveFor on October 16, 2009

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Check out these cool posters for the people fighting the Apocalypse film with only one Archangel to help them film, Legion.

Check out the trailer if you haven’t already seen it.
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It stars Paul Bettany, Dennis Quaid, Tyrese Gibson, Doug Jones, Jon Tenney, Charles S. Dutton, Lucas Black, Kate Walsh, Adrianne Palicki, Kevin Durand, Willa Holland and is due out on 22nd January 2010.
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Source: MovieWeb

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‘Legion’ Red Band Trailer

Posted by LiveFor on August 12, 2009

Longest trailer ever? Probably not, but it’s pretty long! And for a film you haven’t even heard of? Well if it hasn’t hit your radar yet, don’t let that put you off – it’s actually pretty promising. Due for release on 22nd January 2010, here’s what IMDB has to say about it:

After a terrifying biblical apocalypse descends upon the world, a group of strangers stranded in a remote truck stop diner in the Southwest unwittingly become humanity’s last line of defense when they discover the diner’s young waitress is pregnant with the messiah.

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Legion – There will be a whole host of films

Posted by LiveFor on July 27, 2009

ShockTillYouDrop.com has learned that both Paul Bettany and Adrianne Palicki are signed for two Legion sequels.

The first film, directed by Scott Stewart, will be released in theaters by Screen Gems on January 22nd. Dennis Quaid, Tyrese Gibson, Doug Jones, Jon Tenney, Charles S. Dutton, Lucas Black, Kate Walsh, Kevin Durand and Willa Holland co-star.

In the movie, God loses faith in humanity and sends his legion of angels to wipe out the human race for the second time. Mankind’s only hope lies in a group of misfits holed up in a diner in the desert who are aided by the archangel Michael.

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More photos of Crowe as Robin Hood

Posted by LiveFor on June 17, 2009

Filming is well under way for Ridley Scott’s Robin Hood and here are a few more photos of Russell Crowe as Robin Hood. Just Jared had the pics along with a few others.

The photos where taken on Pembrokeshire Beach in Wales. The one below also shows Kevin Durand (Blob in Wolverine) in the back.

Robin Hood stars Russell Crowe, Cate Blanchett, Vanessa Redgrave, Mark Strong, Scott Grimes, Kevin Durand, Alan Doyle, Oscar Isaacs, Lea Seydoux and William Hurt and will be released nationwide on 14th May 2010.

Discuss in the forum or leave a comment below.

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More photos of Crowe as Robin Hood

Posted by LiveFor on June 17, 2009

Filming is well under way for Ridley Scott’s Robin Hood and here are a few more photos of Russell Crowe as Robin Hood. Just Jared had the pics along with a few others.

The photos where taken on Pembrokeshire Beach in Wales. The one below also shows Kevin Durand (Blob in Wolverine) in the back.

Robin Hood stars Russell Crowe, Cate Blanchett, Vanessa Redgrave, Mark Strong, Scott Grimes, Kevin Durand, Alan Doyle, Oscar Isaacs, Lea Seydoux and William Hurt and will be released nationwide on 14th May 2010.

Discuss in the forum or leave a comment below.

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Legion – The end of days in the style of a war movie?

Posted by LiveFor on May 28, 2009

Legion is the supernatural thriller starring Paul Bettany as the archangel Michael, who is all that stands between mankind and an apocalypse after God has lost faith in humanity. But the Almighty apparently hasn’t lost all hope — a child is on the way who is the second coming of Christ, and a group of strangers who recognize the fact must band together to save it.

I mentioned it back in March.

Now Quiet Earth have some more news on the style of the film and a detailed synopsis.

The films director Scott Stewart said “I conceived LEGION more as a comic book action movie than a straight horror film. Despite the obvious horror elements, my primary influence when writing it was less DAWN OF THE DEAD or 28 DAYS LATER, and more the original TERMINATOR with its blend of intense action and inventive mythology.

Stylistically, I intend to ground the fantastic nature of the story in a gritty and realistic visual style. I want the audience to feel like they’ve been dropped right in the middle of the action, so they, like the characters in the film, experience the terror and chaos in a very direct and visceral way. In that regard, the best visual comparison to LEGION are not other horror films but contemporary war films like PLATOON and SAVING PRIVATE RYAN.”

That sounds very cool and a great way to go in making this stand out from the supernatural crowd.

Now for the synopsis:

Without warning, on the night of December 23rd, the prisoners inside a Los Angeles jail go berserk, tearing each other apart. Only one is left standing: MIKE (Paul Bettany) . Meanwhile, in the tiny Mojave desert town of Paradise Falls, JEEP HANSEN (Lucas Black going back to his American Gothic roots) awakens from yet another fever dream and begins to draw. His walls are covered with nightmarish visions of fantastic creatures and heroes, including demon lord BELIAL and a mysterious figure… who looks an awful lot like MIKE.

Later that day while Jeep is working on a car the sky darkens. a mysterious black car arrives and the elderly GLADYS emerges. Inside the diner, BOB (Dennis Quaid), pregnant actress CHARLIE (Adrianne Palicki), the LYMANS, cook PERCY (Charles S. Dutton), and suspicious patron KYLE (Tyrese Gibson) watch Gladys eat a rare and bloody steak. Gladys then revels herself to be a hideous creature and attacks Howard and Bob. Kyle kills her with his .45. The diner is surrounded by thousands of flies, the power goes out and the group is trapped inside.

Mike arrives in a police car and distributes weapons to the group. He reveals that they are witnessing the first signs of a war between humans and a horde of the devil’s minions. The demon-creatures converge on the diner and attack. The group fights back. While awaiting the next onslaught, Jeep finds a transmission on the radio explaining that all of human kind is under siege by demons. Apparently Las Vegas is the only haven left. Amidst the chaos, Charlie’s water suddenly breaks and Audrey helps her deliver a baby boy.

Legion is set to star Dennis Quaid, Paul Bettany, Tyrese Gibson, Kate Walsh, Kevin Durand and Lucas Black.

I really like the sound of this. The story and, more importantly, the style tick all the right boxes for me. Paul Bettany as an archangel will be good and it puts me in mind of a bigger budgeted Prophecy – now it would be good if Christopher Walken had a cameo in this one.

Do you like the sound of this film? What do you want to see in it?

Discuss in the forum or leave a comment below.

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X-Men Origins: Wolverine, 2009 – Movie Review

Posted by LiveFor on April 30, 2009


Director: Gavin Hood
Starring: Hugh Jackman, Liev Schreiber, Lynn Collins, Danny Huston, Ryan Reynolds, Dominic Monaghan, Daniel Henney, Kevin Durand, Taylor Kitsch
Running Time: 107 minutes
Score: 7 / 10

This review by the all powerful, all mighty, full of the awesome Live for Films…that’s me.

Last night my Wife and I went to see X-Men Origins: Wolverine. I’m a long time comic book geek and have always enjoyed the adventures of Marvel’s favourite mutant. We both enjoyed the X-Men films. I thought the second was the best and the third the weakest, but they never really capture Wolverine in his true berserker state that we have seen so many times in the comic.

How did Wolverine’s solo film manage then? It does have its flaws (some pretty big flaws actually) but is a most enjoyable blockbuster film nonetheless. Apologies if this review skips around a bit, but that’s how I roll and also how the film progresses.

As it started up we see a young boy ill in bed being tended by his father (the guy who played Shane in Neighbours) while another young lad with bad nails looks on. Bad things happen, claws pop and a howl to the skies puts the young Wolvie and Sabretooth on the run.

During the build up to the film I had been really excited seeing photos of Hugh Jackman and Liev Schreiber in character during the Civil War, the two World Wars and the Vietnam War. Schreiber is excellent as Sabretooth – menacing, psychotic and just plain nasty. You’ll be pleased to know that his bounding lope type thing you see briefly in the trailer is a lot better and more convincing in the final film.

I thought they would spend a bit of time developing the relationship between the two feral mutants but instead there is a mad dash through the years during the Watchmen inspired opening credits. Seeing the extras and scale of these war scenes in photos and snippets shows that an awful lot of the budget went into these scenes but they are gone within the first few minutes, yet they have the most realistic feel compared to the rest of the film. Almost as if they blew the cash early on and then went “oops, we better reel it in a bit”.

This leads to one of the main problems with the film. It all feels studio bound. Even with scenes that are outside it all feels like a set. Plus some dodgy green screen (the bits with Logan and Silver Fox in the van) and CG effects (the claws in the bathroom scene, and the de-aging of a character at the end) really pull you out of the movie. The recent leaking of the film onto the internet a few weeks ago was said to just be a workprint copy with unfinished effects. If that was the case they should have spent a little longer on them.

As with the dash through the years at the start of the film we are rushed through pretty much everything else. We never really get a chance to savour the moment and wallow in our comic book memories. The most time in one place is up in the Canadian Rockies where Logan spends his time with Kayla Silverfox (Lynn Collins).

After the credits Wolvie and Sabretooth are inducted into the Weapon X program by Stryker (Danny Huston – who uses the same speech pattern as Brian Cox which adds a nice bit of continuity), then we cut to them on a plane with Wade Wilson (Ryan Reynolds), Bolt (Dominic Monaghan), Wraith (Will.i.am), Agent Zero (Daniel Henney), and Frederick J Dukes (Kevin Durand). Unlike the film I’ll spend a bit more time talking about the pack of Mercs. There is some good banter between them and the mission we see gives them all a chance to shine. All are good although Agent Zero’s actions, along with the later Gambit scenes, have some shoddy wire-work which again pulls you out of the film. Durand and Monaghan do a little but not a lot.

It is Ryan Reynolds as Wade Wilson who truly shines. He basically does the same schtick he did in Van Wilder and Blade Trinity, but he does it so well and it is ramped all the way up to 11 in this film. He is the best thing in the early scenes and it is a shame we only get to see him and, to a lesser extent, the rest for such a short amount of time. It would have been great to see them on a couple more missions to get a feel for them working as a team.

It is this rushing through the film that makes me feel the studio had more to say on the matter than the director, Gavin Hood. The whole film could have done with being another 20 or 30 minutes longer.

However, this is a Wolverine film and Hugh Jackman is great in the role. He’s been doing it for a few years now so he is very comfortable in the skin of Logan. The weird thing is that he doesn’t seem to have aged a day since he first appeared in X-Men back in 2000. Hugh is funny, scary, angry and confused at various points of the film and he acts his socks off. There are a few points in the film where you think he is going to pop a blood vessel as he is so worked up. The one fault with him though is that we once again, never really get to see him go fully berserk and become the scary beast he can be in the comic. I thought we would see this in his escape from the Weapon X compound, but he gets out of the tank (fully naked to the delight of my Wife) kills a couple of guards and is then out and away. I would have liked this to last a little longer and have us follow a few guards or something getting picked off from the shadows. The point I’m getting at is that they never really make Wolverine scary. I know that they are aiming for a younger market, but a few scenes to show just how scary it would be to face him or be to know he is hunting you would have been great.

Apart from Ryan Reynolds as Deadpool the other big name Mutant in the film is Gambit (Taylor Kitsch). He is okay, but I never really felt he was as cool as the character could sometimes be in the comic and some of the card effects were just not up to scratch. Just before he sits down with Gambit there is a pleasing nod to the comic book cliche of the heroes fighting first before teaming up and those kind of things really float my boat. There are a few others throughout the film – Holding a loved one while screaming “Noooooo!!!” to the heavens and calling people “Old Friend”. If you are a long time comic book reader then you’ll know what I am getting at and I felt they really added to the whole comic bookiness of the whole thing. I also liked the little nod to Superman with the Ma and Pa Kent types helping Logan.

The final showdown on the Island was good, although I kept saying “Where are all the guards” and it was nice to see lots of familiat Mutants as kids. The final showdown with Deadpool, Logan and Sabretooth doing his best impression of the Millenium Falcon at the end of A New Hope is pretty good, but very short. I still can’t see how they will take the Deadpool from this film and marry it with the Deadpool from the comic if they decide to make a spin-off from the spin-off. I would have loved for the proper Deadpool to have been the one they were fighting with lots of chances for Ryan Reynolds to do his funny dialogue thing he does so well.

Reading back through this it does sound as if I did not like the film. It’s not a Dark Knight or Iron Man, but I really did enjoy it. Like many of these kind of films you can pull them apart if you look too closely at it, but if you enjoy comic book movies then just sit back and let Hugh do his thing. Well worth seeing on the big screen. Don’t forget to wait through all of the credits for the last little bit – I got the Japan ending (more news on the different endings here). I give it 7 out of 10 and my Wife would give it 8 as she said she would give Hugh Jackman one……Hold on a minute…

Have you seen the film? What did you think of it? What post end credit ending did you get?

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X-Men Origins: Wolverine – TV Spot – The Blob

Posted by LiveFor on April 21, 2009

This TV spot focuses on Frederick J. Dukes, aka The Blob (Kevin Durand).

Leave a comment on this post below.

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Robin Hood – Plot Synopsis and Cast list

Posted by LiveFor on March 25, 2009

Universal has announced the full cast listing for Ridley Scott’s Yet-To-Be-Titled Robin Hood movie, which has begun production in the United Kingdom. Joining Russell Crowe and Cate Blanchett will be:

* Vanessa Redgrave (Julia, Atonement) as John and Richard’s mother, Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine
* Mark Strong (Body of Lies, Stardust) as King John’s vicious henchman, Sir Godfrey
* Oscar Isaac (Che, Body of Lies) as King John
* Léa Seydoux (13 French Street, Inglourious Basterds) as the woman who will become queen, French Princess Isabella

Robin’s band of men:

* Scott Grimes (ER, American Dad) as Welshman Will Scarlet
* Kevin Durand (X-Men Origins: Wolverine, 3:10 to Yuma) as Robin’s right-hand, Scotsman Little John
* Alan Doyle as their troubadour, Irishman Allan Adayle

Crowe stars as the legendary figure known by generations as Robin Hood, whose exploits have endured in popular mythology and ignited the imagination of those who share his spirit of adventure and righteousness. In 13th century England, Robin and his band of marauders confront corruption in a local village and lead an uprising against the crown that will forever alter the balance of world power. And whether thief or hero, one man from humble beginnings will become an eternal symbol of freedom for his people.

The untitled Robin Hood adventure chronicles the life of an expert archer, previously interested only in self-preservation, from his service in King Richard’s army against the French. Upon Richard’s death, Robin travels to Nottingham, a town suffering from the corruption of a despotic sheriff and crippling taxation, where he falls for the spirited widow Lady Marion (Blanchett), a woman skeptical of the identity and motivations of this crusader from the forest. Hoping to earn the hand of Maid Marion and salvage the village, Robin assembles a gang whose lethal mercenary skills are matched only by its appetite for life. Together, they begin preying on the indulgent upper class to correct injustices under the sheriff.

With their country weakened from decades of war, embattled from the ineffective rule of the new king and vulnerable to insurgencies from within and threats from afar, Robin and his men heed a call to ever greater adventure. This unlikeliest of heroes and his allies set off to protect their country from slipping into bloody civil war and return glory to England once more.

That excellent picture is by Tony Lee

Source: /film

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