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Posts Tagged ‘Mark Millar’

Bloodshot – Matthew Vaughn to have a go at the Valiant assassin

Posted by LiveFor on March 29, 2010

With Kick-Ass upon us, we now wonder what the director, Matthew Vaughn will turn to next.

Latino Review have the news that it could be another comic book film, but one with nothing to do with Mark Millar.

Matthew Vaughn’s next film is going to be a comic book yet again- but this time it is a comic book adaption of the defunct Valiant comic book BLOODSHOT.

There are two volumes of the comic with slightly different stories. The movie will focus on Volume 2. Bloodshot is about a reanimated government assassin killing machine named Angelo. Vaughn is writing along with Jane Goldman who wrote Stardust and Kick-Ass for him. Vaughn is fully financing and intends to cast the film late summer. William Morris/Endeavor did the deal. And Millar has nothing to do with it. As El Taco entiende, Vaughan doesn’t like Millar’s pathological lies either.

I used to like the Valiant line of comics – Solar Man of the Atom was a fave – but I never got round to reading Bloodshot.

More info on Bloodshot via WikiMortalli is a ruthless killer climbing the mob ranks when his crime family betray and murder him. In an experimental procedure the FBI attempt to extract information from his long-dead brain by injecting microscopic computers called nanites into his blood. The nanites quickly go to work, rebuilding his brain and then the rest of his body, unexpectedly reviving Angelo but erasing his memory in the process. The nanites now fully control Angelo’s body (manipulating blood flow, adrenaline levels etc.) giving him augmented reflexes and strength, enhanced hearing; the ability to heal rapidly, and control of electronic devices. Angry, violent and unsure of what he has become, he escapes. Taking the name Bloodshot, he begins the process of piecing together who he was.

For those not in the know Jane Goldman is the wife of Jonathan Ross and a pic of her is below.

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Cool Kick-Ass billboard

Posted by LiveFor on March 10, 2010

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Mark Millar to direct Trainspotting style Scottish Superhero film

Posted by LiveFor on March 5, 2010

While talking to STV comic book writer Mark Millar (, Wanted, Kick-Ass, Nemesis) spoke about his independant Scottish superhero movie he will be directing this year.

The plan with the Scottish movie was that I realised that everything I’d written, even though I’m a Scottish guy from Coatbridge, everything I’d written was set in New York or Los Angeles. I just thought that’s quite weird; normally people will do something that is a wee bit to do with where they came from, so I thought that it was quite odd that I’ve never done that. It’s a lazy shorthand to always set something in America that everybody understands.

I saw District 9, the South-African alien movie. I thought that that was quite interesting to see something that people don’t associate with South Africa, which is alien invasions, to juxtapose two things and make something quite interesting and quite odd, and I thought wouldn’t it be cool to do a superhero movie in Scotland.

Not a cheesy BBC Scotland comedy kind of thing, but to make it cool, as cool as X Men 2 was or whatever. Not costumes and that kind of stuff, a 21st century Trainspotting kind of thing about people with superpowers and make it epic, make it big and grand in scope, try and do something that’s unexpected.

So my plan is to start directing that in June, June and July. We’re prepping it just now. We want to do it with an entirely new cast, people nobody have seen before, young people from Glasgow and Edinburgh and work with local teams. Everyone that works on the movie we want to try and keep Scottish and just create a superhero movie with its own unique flavour.

Sounds very good doesn’t it. Will be interesting to hear more about the plot as at the moment it sounds a little like the Channel 4 TV show, Misfits. Millar is certainly becoming big news in movieland. Wanted was a big success at the box office and the Kick-Ass adaption has had hugely positive reviews from preview screenings.

I just hope that when he gets into the directing chair it doesn’t go all Frank Miller on The Spirit!

Source: Bleeding Cool

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Superman – What do we need for the film to be good?

Posted by LiveFor on February 25, 2010

A story broke yesterday in Latino Review stating that David Goyer would be penning the proposed new Superman film. Since then there has been conflicting reports from all directions; Goyer is involved, Goyer is not involved, Hell even Christopher Nolan is not involved! Until a spokesman clears the situation up we are left to speculate and we all know the internet loves to speculate, so for arguments sake let’s say Goyer is involved. Would he be the right man? Will he be writing alone? What story will he be using?

David Goyer has a chequered track record. On one hand, he successfully developed Marvel character Blade in the first two instalments before single-handedly destroying what he had built with Blade Trinity which he directed as well as writing. Other blemishes on his resume include the farcical Jumper as writer, The Invisible (not to be confused with Grant Morrison’s The Invisibles) as director and one of the worst horror films ever made, The Unborn, which he both wrote and directed. Along with television series Flash Forward, Goyer has his fair share of detractors. Arguably his greatest success along with Blade was his involvement in Christopher Nolan’s Batman double, Batman Begins and The Dark Knight in which the later he shared a writing credit with Nolan’s brother Jonathan. With the monumental success of The Dark Knight and the news of Christopher Nolan being installed as ‘Godfather’ to the new Superman project it was inevitable Goyers name would be mooted.

Would he be the right man? Well as previously mentioned, Goyer does have some good and some bad but his writing credits are far greater than his directing efforts. Blade, Blade II, as well as Alex Proyas’ underrated sci-fi classic Dark City show that he does possess a deal of talent, but all of those projects pale in comparison to The Dark Knight.

With its dark undertones of crime and politics, The Dark Knight was more than just a superhero movie but is that what Superman needs? With two of The Dark Knight trio rumoured to be involved in Superman, it begs the question if Goyer is writing the script, will he be alone? Jonathan Nolan has worked with brother Christopher on The Prestige as well as The Dark Knight, but was not involved in Insomnia, Batman Begins or Inception so they are by no means inseparable and with Christopher’s role in the project still a little hazy it does not guarantee any involvement on Jonathan’s part. But until some confirmed facts about who exactly is working on the project surface and a director is named we can only speculate.

Stories for comic book adaptations are always a source of heated debate. Fans have their own favourite arcs and characters. Should it be an origins story? “Well that seems too commonplace these days and I suppose there’s Smallville for its sins”. “But it needs to be freshened up, it’s always the same with Lex and Lois and Clark!” What about a darker version? “Well that goes against Superman. Why does everything need to be dark these days?” These are arguments I hear all the time but what are the options? To be honest, we could spend all day discussing great Superman stories; Superman: Red Son, The Death of Superman, Whatever Happened to The Man of Tomorrow? But the rumoured story says the new film is set to adapt is John Byrne’s 80’s series The Man of Steel (although John Byrne has said he has not been approached about it) which is essentially an origins story. How much of this will be used is again up for debate, but a meeting between Batman and Superman in issue three is a little odd. Of course Batman and Superman have met in numerous comics over the years but the news of Nolans involvement in a Superman film from a comic which features both characters seems a little strange or even convenient. A lot of fans are keen on an epic idea that comic book scribe Mark Millar had planned well over a year ago. In an interview with Empire in late 2008, Millar talked about creating an 8 hour story which would chart the life of Kal-El from his birth until he is the only man left on Earth. Read the full interview here.

Lex Luthor


So very little to go on as a rather confusing cloud surrounds the future of Superman, but what would you like to see? Villains? Story? Writer? Director? Star?

Now debate away…

Discuss in the Forum or the comments below.

By Richard Bodsworth

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UPDATED: Exclusive Interview – Paul McGuigan talks modern day Sherlock Holmes, Deathlok, Bond, Grant Morrison and more

Posted by LiveFor on February 22, 2010

Scottish director Paul McGuigan made his name with British gangster film, Gangster Number 1 before moving across to the States where he worked with big names such as Josh Hartnett, Bruce Willis and Morgan Freeman in Lucky Number Slevin. With his energetic and unique visual style, McGuigan is one of the biggest Scottish directors working in Hollywood today. We were lucky enough to catch up with Paul to discuss his previous films and his upcoming projects. Richard of LFF took the interview so without further ado over to Rich.

When I call, he is taking a break from editing his latest project; a modern day take on Sherlock Holmes for the BBC with Benedict Cumberbatch as Holmes and Martin Freeman as his loyal sidekick Watson. Three feature length episodes are planned; McGuigan will direct the first due out in the autumn.

(Noise)
PM: Sorry, I’m editing next to Dr Who, there was a big meeting today it’s a bit noisy

McGuigan eventually finds a quite spot in the corner and I open by trying to grab some information about the rumours surrounding his next film.

LFF: So I heard some news about a new project this morning, can you talk about it?

PM: Well I’m hoping to sign on in the next few days.

LFF: It’s written by the guys that did The Hangover, right?

PM: Yeah, it’s their next film.

LFF: Is it a flat out comedy?

PM: It’s a comedy thriller. But I’m waiting until the ink has been dried on the contract before I can really start talking about it.

The Acid House


LFF: Of course. So I was going to start by talking about some of your older films, The Acid House was your first feature, right?

PM: It was yeah, it was three short stories. I initially directed one short called The Granton Star Cause and it did pretty well on Channel 4 so they wanted to do all three. I’d only done documentaries before and was a photographer before that, so when Irvine Welsh asked me to do it, I initially turned it down because it wasn’t what I was used to doing. But then he told me about the story about the man having a bad day, meeting God in the pub and it was just crazy! I thought if it’s going to fail I may as well go out in a blaze of glory. It turned out to be such fun to do, Channel 4 wanted it to be a proper Irvine Welsh story and not filter it for an English audience. It was fun.

Paul Bettany in Gangster Number 1


LFF: So after that you made Little Angels (a docu-drama focusing on heroin addicts) and Gangster Number 1. Along with The Acid House, did you get the feeling you were marked as a controversial director?

PM: Aye, but I’d say life is pretty controversial, I mean you’re going to come cross times when you’re not in a good place. Sometime real life is not filtered through on to the screen in the way some people would like it to. Life imitates art whereas art never usually imitates life and art always imitates art if you will, so for a genre like gangster films the only reference points we have of gangsters are through the cinema, and we just keep copying ourselves which means we portray gangsters in a certain way. But that’s fine that’s a good way of getting to an audience because they are comfortable with that, it’s what they are used to, but then you have to start breaking down some of the barriers of it. The lifestyle isn’t always glamorous; it can be ugly and violent. I always think violence is a hard thing for a director to portray; I don’t want to advocate it’s like pornography where you get off on it because that’s not the case. Violence to me is always the sounds and the hatred in the person perpetrating the violence. So what I wanted to do (In Gangster) was kill the audience that were watching it, you don’t see much when Paul Bettany strips naked and butchers the guy with an axe, but it’s still a very violent scene. I didn’t want to let the audience off with that you know? I wanted to show that violence was not glamorous. It’s also hard trying to find new ways to shoot violence, give it an original point of view to all the others.

LFF: Even though a lot of people really like Gangster Number 1, do you think it’s a bit underrated?

PM: I think a lot of my films are. Any director will tell you that about their movies. It seems to take time for people to find my movies. It’s like Lucky Number Slevin, it didn’t make millions at box office but then went on to make a ton on DVD. It’s almost like people found it and went “oh I’ve found this cool movie” and then claim it for themselves. It was the same with The Acid house.

LFF: I think I know what you mean. I stumbled across Wicker Park in Blockbuster, had never heard of it but I went on to enjoy it.

PM: Yeah It’s strange. I don’t think my style is as palatable to a mainstream audience marketable and it is to certain people. Production companies always seem to find them hard to market. Its like, “is Wicker Park a love story? Is it a thriller?” Well no, it’s not a love story because if it was a love story I would have shot it differently, so yeah it’s a thriller. So they always seem to have a problem marketing it.

The Reckoning


LFF: I was reading up on a film called The Reckoning but I had never heard of it.

PM: Well the reckoning is a prime example of bad marketing. I’m working with the likes of Martin Freeman and Benedict and they have never heard of it, it’s about the birth of modern day theatre you’d have thought they might have seen it! (laughs) It’s not bad, beautiful looking film, but it’s quite an art house movie, I wasn’t trying to make a mainstream film I just wanted to make a film about something I thought was interesting.

LFF: It boasts a great cast too.

PM: Yeah it’s got Paul Bettany, Vincent Cassell is in it, Wilem Defoe, Brian Cox.

LFF: I can’t seem to find it anywhere!

PM: (laughs) well there you go! But essentially it’s an expensive art house film lets put it that way, ill hold my hands up and say that’s what it is. But after that I realised I just needed to concentrate on what I’m best at and try and make films people want to see.

LFF: So after that you moved to the US, was it Gangster that brought you attention from America?

PM: Yeah it definitely was, it was a great calling card. I got a call from Robert Newman and he said it was getting a great reaction. After that I got the chance to meet Bruce Willis and some other big actors who said they wanted to work with me, and later on they came true to their word and worked with me on different projects over the years. But it still is a great calling card, people really like it.

McGuigan and Freeman - Lucky Number Slevin


LFF: After you completed Wicker Park in the US, would you say Slevin cemented you over there?

PM: To be honest it’s all indie companies I’ve worked for so I’ve always been on that side of the fence. Even with Push, I’ve never a studio movie.

LFF: I assume the next one will be for a studio?

PM: It’s not like I go out of my way to avoid it. I have been attached to various Marvel projects to James Bond.

LFF: Really?

PM: Yeah for Casino Royale. I was down to the last two, it would have been great and I haven’t given that one up just yet. Not like playing for Glasgow Celtic or playing in front of a crowd at the Barrowlands, some things you have to give up (laughs) but that’s not one of them.

LFF: Who would you cast as Bond?

PM: I think James McAvoy would be great. Daniel Craig is very good though. The thing that I didn’t like about Quantum of Solace is it took itself too god damn seriously. There’s a great sense of fun attached to Bond films and that has to be embraced, you can be serious when it’s required, but you just have to relax a bit.

Deathlok

LFF: Another project you were linked to was Deathlok

PM: Deathlok was just taking too long in development. David Self wrote it and it was a great script, the hardest thing bout Deathlok and this sounds crazy but was to get the idea of Knight Rider out of my head! Just couldn’t get over that. I really wanted to do that film but I had to put on the backburner.

LFF: But you got to kind of make a ‘superhero’ film with Push.

PM: I suppose so, yeah, but I never really approached it that way. Push was me wanting to do an action film, you know? Before the Acid House I never watched Trainspotting, so I never watched X Men or anything like that which might have influenced the way I do things, I just like to do my own thing. But obviously certain people and studios always want certain things in there.

LFF: Push isn’t as glossy, if you will, compared to other ‘superhero’ films

PM: I would have made it grittier if I could have! But what you have to remember is with these ‘superhero’ films if you want to call them, is that you’re up against these big budget pieces with the greatest technologies available. Push was made for $25m, which is a lot of money, but that’s not much compared to those films which are up to £100m now. But that shouldn’t put off and I think it’s a pretty cool movie.

McGuigan with Chris Evans - Push


LFF: So let’s talk about Sherlock again, is it anything with Guy Ritchie’s recent film?

PM: No. It’s written by Steven Moffat who does Doctor Who and Mark Gatiss from League of Gentlemen. They are big fans and wanted to do an updated version, he has to be smarter now he’s up against all this new technology. I think it’s harder to make him modern and immediate being set in the present day rather than back in the olden days. I thought Guy Ritchie’s film was entertaining, but that’s what it has to be as a lot of people see it as a bit of a romp. But we want to bring it back to the clever detective side. The BBC are putting a bit of a wedge behind it so hopefully it will do well.

LFF: So no pipes and hats then?

PM: (laughs) No, no hats, but I thought that might be cool. He’s covered in nicotine patches and that kinda stuff. It pays homage to the originals, it still feels like Baker Street but with plasmas televisions.

Grant Morrison


LFF: The Acid House is still the only thing you have filmed in Scotland, would you be interested in making something else there?

PM: Yeah Grant Morrison and myself are working on, I wouldn’t call it a secret project, but a project with Stephen Fry and it’s a thriller set in Scotland. Me and Grant have been friends for a while and we wanted to do something together and Grant went off and wrote a treatment, so it’s at the treatment stage at the moment.

UPDATE: The show is going to be called Bonnyroad according to Bleeding Cool. END OF LINE

LFF: Is it a full series?

PM: It’s seven episodes. It takes place over seven days around an event that happens in Scotland. It’s a modern take on an old fable or fairy story. If you know Grants work you might have an idea of what it will be like. It’s like Twin Peaks meets Brigadoon! It’s off the wall and smart but in a watchable commercial way. It’s still in the early stages but I’m very excited about it.

LFF: There’s still not a large amount of ‘big’ Scottish directors out there at the moment.

PM: I think we quietly work away, you’ve got MacKenzie and Peter Mullan who I think is great, he has a story to tell. So not quite a full squad yet, we’ve probably got a five a side.

LFF: Do you think more could be done to help develop talent?

PM: There has to be grassroots. Eighteen year olds will look at it and think, “I can’t see a career for me here”, so they make it creating video games and things like that. We need to change that mindset and get back into it. I read some stats the other day and it said film and television in Scotland work an average of seven days a year, that’s no career it’s almost a hobby. It’s sad. But the BBC seem to be keen in putting some money in and hopefully it’s just a bump in the road. There’s some great talent up here, it just needs to be harvested.

LFF: Mark Millar is rumoured to be writing a Scottish superhero tale. Would a film version interest you?

PM: Mark’s a talented boy, but I don’t think he will work with me after I slagged off his last film, Wanted. I never insulted him directly because he didn’t even write the screenplay and I wouldn’t intentionally slag off someone else’s work but certain people stirred it up. The funniest part was when Morgan Freeman, who I adore, started talking about the weavers or something. I just wanted to pause it and rewind it in the cinema and say, “sorry, are they trying to tell us this makes any sense?!” But good luck and good power to the man.

Check out the other LFF interviews including Duncan Jones, Mike Sizemore, Johnny Depp, Tony Grisoni, Michael Marshall Smith, Neal Asher, Leslie Simpson and more.

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Kick-Ass – New Big Daddy poster

Posted by LiveFor on February 17, 2010

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Nemesis – Cover for Mark Millar’s new comic

Posted by LiveFor on February 13, 2010

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SXSW Film Festival Announces Panels & Shorts

Posted by LiveFor on February 10, 2010

MICHEL GONDRY, QUENTIN TARANTINO, ELI ROTH, MATTHEW VAUGHN, MARK MILLAR AND DAVID GORDON GREEN AMONG KEY PANELISTS AT 2010 EVENT
The South by Southwest (SXSW) Film Conference and Festival is thrilled to announce over 80 Film Conference panels and 130 short films for the 2010 event, which will take place Friday, March 12 – Saturday, March 20, 2010 in Austin, Texas. The SXSW Film Festival will open with the world premiere of Kick-Ass, directed by Matthew Vaughn and starring Aaron Johnson, Cholë Grace Moretz, Christopher Mintz-Plasse and Nicolas Cage. The schedule, complete with both screening and panel dates and times, will be available on Monday, February 15th at http://www.sxsw.com/film. Visit often for more information and updates.

The SXSW Film Conference starts on Friday, March 12 and runs through Tuesday, March 16, 2010. New major panelists added to the SXSW Film Conference include Michel Gondry (filmmaker, The Thorn in the Heart, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind), Quentin Tarantino (filmmaker, Inglorious Basterds), David Gordon Green (filmmaker, Eastbound & Down, Pineapple Express), Peter Becker (President, Criterion Collection), David Wohl (Radical Publishing) and Susan Bradley (Pixar). Other upgrades to the 2010 Conference include more workshop sessions, more mentor sessions, and over 20 Crossover Panels (open to both Film and Interactive registrants).

“We are dedicated to presenting a strong conference that offers unique vaule for our registrants from both the Film and Interactive worlds,” says Film Conference and Producer Janet Pierson, “This year is no different – not only do our panels cover a wide range of crucial and timely topics, but we’ve assembled a dynamic group up of high-level talent to share their experiences and insight. ”

Also announced was the complete Short films lineup, which will debut at this year’s Festival from March 12 – 20, 2010. Over the course of nine days, 130 short films will screen at the festival, selected from 2,312 short film submissions. A comprehensive list of the short films lineup is detailed below.

“After months of watching incredible shorts, we’re excited to finally unveil our complete lineup,” said Shorts Co-Programmers Claudette Godfrey and Stephanie Noone, “Every film in our program has a unique voice, embodies the energy of SXSW, and leaves a lasting impression that we are thrilled to share with an audience.”

A sampling of key panels follows below, as well as the complete panel breakdown, by date and title. For full panel descriptions and participants, visit www.sxsw.com/film/talks/panels.

A Conversation with Michel Gondry
The stratospheric rise of Academy Award-winning visionary Michel Gondry is one of the great success stories of modern film. Working with fellow travelers like Spike Jonze, Charlie Kaufman and Bjork, Gondry has made his mark on the film landscape with iconic work like Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and The Science of Sleep. Come and enjoy what promises to be a fascinating discussion as Gondry discusses his latest, highly personal and emotionally raw documentary A Thorn in the Heart with TCM’s Elvis Mitchell.

Directing the Dead: Genre Directors Spill Their Guts
How does modern horror take gore beyond the purely grisly to the level of grand guignol art and imagination? How does bone-cracking violence and flesh-rending horror contribute to the hallowed pantheon of art and cinema? Join five of the most striking genre filmmakers in modern movies as they lock horns over the all-important issues of blood, guts and gratuitous gore. Featuring Ruben Fleischer (Zombieland), Matt Reeves (Let Me In) Eli Roth (Hostel), Quentin Tarantino (Inglorious Basterds), Ti West (House of the Devil), moderated by Scott Weinberg (Cinematical)

Filmmakers in TV: A Case Study
Carving a niche in the world of film is tough enough, and achieving the same feat on the small screen is no easier. Successfully mastering both is in yet another league, but somehow the creators of HBO’s Eastbound & Down are pulling it off with style. Find out how Danny McBride (Your Highness), and filmmakers David Gordon Green (Pineapple Express) and Jody Hill (Observe and Report) made it look easy in this illuminating, entertaining glimpse at the art of combining technical skill, sharp comedy writing and moving from the packed auditorium to the living room couch.

Creating a Graphic Novel Hollywood Will Buy
Graphic novels are red hot in Hollywood now. With its combination of words and visuals in one attractive package, a comic book can be a great sales tool when pitching your project to studios. Ean Mering (Pomegranate) talks to David Wohl (Radical Publishing), Martin Shapiro (Night Owl Productions), Matt Hawkins (Top Cow) and Ted Adams (IDW Publishing) will explain how to create a graphic novel that will attract the attention of movie producers.

Previously announced participants for the 2010 SXSW Film Conference include Jeffery Tambor’s Acting Workshop, a Kick-Ass Conversation panel with director Matthew Vaughn, actors Aaron Johnson, Cholë Grace Moretz and Christopher Mintz-Plasse, and comic writers Mark Millar and John S. Romita, Academy Award-winning Argentine composer, solo artist and producer Gustavo Santaolalla in Conversation with BMI’s Doreen Ringer Ross, and Cult comics legend Gilbert Shelton in Conversation with Harry Knowles.

Thanks to Rich for passing the info along.

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Kick-Ass – UK Quad poster

Posted by LiveFor on February 5, 2010


Another cool poster for Matthew Vaughn’s adaption of the Mark Millar, John Romita Jr comic. Empire debuted it.

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Glasgow Film Festival 2010 – 18th – 28th February

Posted by LiveFor on January 28, 2010

The Glasgow Film Festival is next month. Unfortunately I can’t make it, but Live For Films intrepid reviewer, Richard Bodsworth can. Here is what he has to share about it.

The sixth Glasgow Film Festival is set to light up screens in February bringing a host of premieres, unique events and special guests to the city. Building on the record-breaking success of the 2009 Festival, the 2010 edition runs from February 18 – 28th and will screen more than 120 features across eighteen locations including host venue the Glasgow Film Theatre and three screens at the Cineworld. 

The Festival opens on Thursday February 18th with a gala screening of Micmacs, the latest delight from Amélie director Jean-Pierre Jeunet starring France’s hottest comedy talent Danny Boon. A hilarious tale of outrageous injustice and ingenious revenge, it features a star-studded cast of French greats that includes Andre Dussolier, Yolande Moreau, Dominique Pinon and Jean-Pierre Marielle.

The Festival closes on Sunday 28th with the world premiere of Legacy, a taut psychological thriller from Glasgow company Black Camel Pictures and writer/director Thomas Ikimi. The Wire star, Idris Elba, is the lead actor and executive producer of an ambitious production in which a veteran soldier broods on the guilty legacy of his past actions and the one possibility of his future redemption. The cast includes Clarke Peters and Eamonn Walker.

Funded by Glasgow City Marketing Bureau, Scottish Screen and the Glasgow Film Theatre, the full Festival programme is filled with big name stars in must-see films. Scottish Oscar-winner, Tilda Swinton, plays a stylish, enigmatic matriarch in the UK premiere of I Am Love, one of the most critically acclaimed films of the past year. Nicolas Cage gives an unforgettable performance in Werner Herzog’s Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans. Shirley Henderson and Charlotte Rampling lead a stellar ensemble in Todd Solondz’s Life During Wartime. Robert De Niro heads an all-star cast in Kirk Jones Everybody’s Fine. Maggie Smith and Dominic West appear in Julian Fellowes’ From Time To Time. Pierce Brosnan and Susan Sarandon star in The Greatest. Til Schweiger returns in the international premiere of Rabbit Without Ears 2 and Drew Barrymore turns director for the rollerskating romp Whip It! 

A strong line-up of international screenings consolidates the Glasgow Film Festival’s reputation for bringing the best of world cinema to Glasgow screens and includes key prize-winners from the international Festival circuit. The programme includes Cannes sensations I Killed My Mother, Dogtooth and Nobody Knows About Persian Cats, Venice Golden Lion winner Lebanon, Toronto People’s Choice winner The Topp

The Festival continues its widely applauded tradition of honouring a major Hollywood star each year with a 2010 retrospective devoted to the career of Cary Grant. The debonair star remains the gold standard for impeccable comic timing and tender-hearted romances and the Festival will screen a selection of his finest films including Bringing Up Baby (1938), Notorious (1946), An Affair To Remember (1957) and North By Northwest (1959).

FrightFest highlights include the world premiere of 2001 Maniacs: Field Of Screams, the eagerly-awaited (REC) 2, 1970s shocker A Lizard In A Woman’s Skin and the UK premiere of Splice introduced by director Vincenzo Natali.

The Festival is also set to welcome a record number of guests to the city including the legendary James Earl Jones who will discuss a career in film that stretches from Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove (1963) to Field Of Dreams (1989) and includes such landmark films as Conan The Barbarian (1981), Coming To America (1988), The Hunt For Red October (1990), his towering Oscar-nominated performance in The Great White Hope (1970) and his contribution to the Star Wars series as the voice of Darth Vader.

A wide-range of masterclasses and special events will also include appearance from Oscar-winning Scottish director Kevin Macdonald and Peter Mullan who holds a unique position in world cinema as the Cannes Best Actor winner for My Name Is Joe (1998) and the Venice Golden Lion recipient for The Magdalene Sisters (2002).

There is a pretty impressive line up here, the prospect of FrightFest weekend is particularly exciting and I hope to attend Mark Millar’s scheduled In Person show. With a lot of big shows and big names attending you can expect tickets to go fast so book now. Money saving deals are available online if you wish to buy in bulk. 

Tickets are available through the official film festival website www.glasgowfilmfestival.org.uk, in person at the box office and by calling +44 (0)141 332 6535.

GFF Box Office
Glasgow Film Theatre
12 Rose Street
Glasgow
G3 6RB

FrightFest weekend passes which include all 8 films (Frozen, 2001 Maniacs: Fields of Screams, Stag Night, A Lizard in A Woman’s Skin, Amer (Bitter), [REC] 2, Splice and Reykjavik Whale Watching Massacre) are available priced at £40.  You can also purchase individual days or individual screenings.

I hope to see some of you guys there!

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