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Posts Tagged ‘Neil Gaiman’

Peachy Keen! Sandman – Matthew Vaughn has an idea for Neil Gaiman’s classic comic

Posted by LiveFor on March 14, 2010

Neil Gaiman is a great comic book writer and novelist. One of his greatest achievements is the DV Vertigo comic, Sandman. It mainly follows the character of Dream or Morpheus of the Endless who is the anthropomorphic representation of dreams. He is Lord of the Dreaming and the Endless is also composed of Death, Desire, Destruction, Destiny, Despair, and Delirium.

The comic had a run of 75 issues with many specials dotted around and featured Lucifer, Merv Pumpkinhead, and numerous other characters. It covered different pieces of folklore and legend and was just bloody brilliant.

The look of Dream was also based on Mr Gaiman and the pic I’ve used on the post was one I used to paint a huge Sandman on a wall in a flat I used to live in. Plus I drew something similar for the wedding of my good friend Neil C.

Needless to say I would love to see Sandman on the big screen. However, due to the huge scope of the tales involved a movie wouldn’t do it justice. It has been mentioned many times over the years as a possible film, as has one about the character of Death (I mentioned that way back in November 2008 and Gaiman has recently mentioned how Guillermo del Toro may be involved). That’s where Matthew Vaughn comes in.

The director of Kick-Ass, Layer Cake and Stardust (another Gaiman tale) has been talking at the SXSW Festival to MTV news about how he’d like to adapt the Sandman to a TV show.

“I think it would make an amazing HBO series, you know, where you can just really create that world,” Vaughn said. “There’s too much to get into an hour and a half, two hours.”

“[Neil and I] talked about it,” he continued. “I think as a movie it’s virtually impossible to make properly.”

Not much yet, but the fact he has been chatting to Gaiman about it sounds promising. However, they would need an awful lot of money to make it, but if they did I feel it would be huge.

Would you like to see a Sandman TV series? If it did come to pass who would you like to see play Dream and the rest of the Endless? What stories from the comic series would have to be included in the TV show?

Absolute Sandman – Volume 1. Amazon.co.uk
The Absolute Sandman, Vol. 1. Amazon.com

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The Random – Robert Pattinson & Sean Penn, Promised Land, The Graveyard Book, Martin Scorsese to direct Hugo Cabret, Burke and Hare

Posted by LiveFor on January 22, 2010

– Sean Penn and Robert Pattinson are considering joining Water for Elephants at Fox 2000 reports Variety. Based on the best-selling historical novel by Sara Gruen, the story centers on a 90-year-old man (Pattinson) reminiscing about his life and is set during the Depression. At the time the man found work at a B-level circus taking care of the animals. He sees the brutality of circus life while falling for the wife of an abusive animal trainer (Penn). Reese Witherspoon is already attached to play the wife.

– Michael Winterbottom (“Nine Songs”) is next set to direct the $5 million indie Promised Land for Revolution Studios reports Variety. The story deals with the events that lead up to the 1948 partition of Palestine and the subsequent creation of the state of Israel. Jim Sturgess (“Across the Universe,” “21”) will star as a British officer hunting down the extremist Jewish factions.

– Neil Gaiman says the film adaptation of his The Graveyard Book is still on the cards. Speaking to The Los Angeles Times Gaiman said “It was all put together over at Miramax Films. The people there had a long, great relationship with Neil Jordan and it was all set up and ready to go, and then Miramax was more or less erased from existence. It became a filing cabinet in somebody’s desk, more or less… But it looks like almost all the pieces are on the table again. They have a studio, they have a distributor and they are putting stuff together and I’m not allowed to say anything else.”

– Martin Scorsese is in talks to direct a live-action adaptation of Brian Selznick’s children’s book The Invention of Hugo Cabret reports Variety. The 2008 novel centers on an orphaned boy who secretly lives in the walls of a busy Paris train station and looks after the clocks. He gets caught up in a mystery adventure when he attempts to repair a mechanical man.

– Isla Fisher (“Wedding Crashers,” “Confessions of a Shopaholic”) and Tom Wilkinson (“Michael Clayton,” “Duplicity”) have joined the horror comedy Burke and Hare says Heat Vision Blog.
The film is based on the true story a pair of the U.K.’s earliest serial killers, William Burke (Simon Pegg) and William Hare (Andy Serkis), gravediggers who lucratively sold the corpses of their victims to a medical college for dissection. Fisher will play Pegg’s girlfriend, an actress looking for a patron who might or might not be an accomplice to the murders. Wilkinson will play Dr. Robert Knox, an anatomy lecturer looking for fresh corpses. John Landis directs.

– John and Drew Dowdle (“Quarantine”) are set to direct an adaptation of Jack Kilborn’s gory novel Afraid reports Production Weekly. Larry Malkin and Chad Thumann will adapt the script about five government-sponsored lethal torturers wrongly sent on a mission to a small, sleepy Wisconsin town. The military sends in a bunch of Green Berets, Special Forces, SEALs and marines to take down this killing force. However it’s the townsfolk who band together to save their home that will make the critical difference.

Source: Dark Horizons

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Lovecraft: Fear of the Unknown – Documentary about the writer and his influence

Posted by LiveFor on October 3, 2009

Lovecraft_PosterAs long time readers of the site will know I love me a bit of Lovecraft. It just spooks the hell out of me and fires my imagination (plus The Call of Cthulhu RPG is great as well). Now, thanks to io9, I have found out about this cool sounding documentary about the man himself.

A chronicle of the life, work and mind that created the Cthulhu mythos.

Not only is it about Lovecraft it also features interviews with some great people – Guillermo Del Toro, Neil Gaiman, John Carpenter, Peter Straub, Stuart Gordon, Caitlin R. Kiernan, Ramsey Campbell, S.T. Joshi, Andrew Migliore and Robert M. Price.

Available on DVD & Blu-Ray 13th October 2009

Check out the official site for more info.

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Neil Gaiman’s library

Posted by LiveFor on September 4, 2009

booksHow cool is this. I so want a library like this. If any one is willing to donate a big house to the Live for Films cause that includes a library like this I will be more than happy to accept it.

If Mr Gaiman happens to be reading this I would be more than happy to pop round for a cup of tea while interviewing you in the library.

The good people over at Shelfari had this to say and lots more photos.

Gaiman first gained wide acclaim with his complex and literate 75-issue comic series The Sandman, and has since broadened his scope to write award-winning and bestselling novels (American Gods, Anansi Boys), screenplays (“Beowulf”) and yes, he still continues to write comics. His books Stardust and Coraline were both adapted for the screen and his most recent novel The Graveyard Book was awarded the Newbury Medal and, just last month, a Hugo Award for Best Novel.

Naturally we’d assumed that someone whose work is filled with references ranging from literary to mythological would have a fairly extensive library but even so, we were a bit unprepared for the scope of what he sent us. In the basement of his house of secrets we find a room that’s wall-to-wall and floor-to-ceiling with books (along with a scattering of awards, gargoyles and felines).

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The Graves – In Skull City death is the least of your problems

Posted by LiveFor on March 28, 2009

THE GRAVES‘ is the feature film directorial debut of Brian Pulido (creator of comics “Lady Death” & “Evil Ernie”), starring acclaimed horror genre stars Clare Grant (Masters of Horror “Valerie Under the Stairs”), Jillian Murray (The Fun Park), Bill Moseley (Texas Chainsaw Massacre II, House of 1,000 Corpses, The Devil’s Rejects), Amanda Wyss (A Nightmare on Elm St., Dexter), D. Randall Blythe (singer, Lamb of God), Patti Tindall (Death of a Ghost Hunter) and Tony Todd (Final Destination I & II, the ‘Candyman’ series, NBC’s “Chuck”) as the Reverend Stockton.

‘THE GRAVES’ is produced by Mischief Maker Studios & Ronalds Brothers Productions.

Present day. Arizona. Megan and Abby Graves are inseparable sisters that couldn’t be less alike. Megan is a self-assured, naturally attractive, ass kicker. Abby is a cute, caustic, Hot Topic Goth who’s afraid of her own shadow.

They do share a few things in common: a life-long obsession with comics, pop culture and rock ‘n’ roll. Simply put, they are beautiful geeks.

In a few days, Megan will start a new job in New York. To send her off in style, the Graves sisters go on a wild, pop culture bender that includes a trip to uncharted Arizona in search of a kitchy roadside attraction.

Instead, they’re lured to Skull City Mine, a weather-beaten, abandoned mine town that harbors terrifying secrets. It appears to be haunted — Its twisted caretakers are murderous — Victim’s souls are ripped right out of their bodies – and that is only the beginning…

When Megan suffers a mortal wound, Abby must save her sister, but to do so, she must confront her fears and unlock the mystery of Skull City alone.

Can Abby survive Skull City’s threats? Can she rescue Megan or are they doomed to a fate much worse than death?

Check out the official site.

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Neil Gaiman On The Colbert Report

Posted by LiveFor on March 17, 2009

Here is Neil Gaiman talkin to Stephen Colbert about The Graveyard Book, Coraline and his early influences.

Leave a comment on this post below.

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Coraline, 2009 – Movie Review

Posted by LiveFor on February 9, 2009


Director: Henry Selick
Starring: Dakota Fanning, Teri Hatcher, Jennifer Saunders, Dawn French, Keith David, John Hodgman, Ian McShane
Running Time: 100 minutes
Score
: 8 / 10

This excellent review by Babubhaut

OK America, before you go blindly into an animated film with your young children, why don’t you do a little research on what they are about to witness. A PG rating and stop-motion animated aesthetic do not always make a child-friendly adventure. Based upon the horror novella by acclaimed author Neil Gaiman, Henry Selick’s Coraline is chockfull of heavy material, dark story threads, and bleak possibilities. For a guy like me, those things equal undivided success; for a child aged ten, those things equal nightmare filled evenings and parents writing angry letters to Focus Features for subjecting their children to lewd and horrific imagery. Well guess what parents? No one is to blame but you. I’m not saying keep all youngsters away, but do use some discretion on whether your son or daughter can handle the fantastical elements. This is very much Alice in Wonderland displayed in all its non-Disney possibilities. A cautionary tale on being careful what you wish for, our heroine must discover the difference between a world of people neglecting her and that of people doing all they can so that they may give her all she could ever want in the future. Life is not about getting it all right now, but instead a slow and steady climb built on love and trust, one whose benefits far outweigh the whirlwind romance that is never truly as it seems.

Remember folks, this is a story that won the 2002 Bram Stoker Award for Best Work for Young Readers; it’s not all sing-songy like Selick’s masterpiece A Nightmare Before Christmas. With that said, however, it is very, very good in a very, very different way. Be prepared for a methodically and deliberately paced story. More psychological terror than jump out at you scares, the tale of Coraline escaping into a parallel world, perfectly mirrored of her own only inhabited by animated dolls, is one of enlightenment and discovery of what love truly means. Do we all want the parents that dote on us? The guardians that will do what we want and when we want it? Of course we do. But that idyllic utopia doesn’t exist, especially in the times for which we live today. Children need to be raised and supported and that takes money and a lot of hard work. What may seem like neglect in the eyes of a child is really two people doing all they can, sacrificing their time, in order to give him/her a chance at success. Only when Coraline sees the manipulation and truth behind the “kindness” her Other-Mother gives her does she realize what she has back at home.

What we are shown is a world through a tiny door in the wall of an old triple-segmented home. There are stories about this door used to explain the disappearances of some local children, including the sister of loudmouthed and shy Wybie Lovat’s grandmother. Only a weathered black cat appears to know what is going on, what the too good to be true farce beyond the door is actually masking behind it. This cat can travel between worlds and therefore knows it all, allowing him to warn Coraline by orchestrating events via those she encounters. A disgruntled child is easily malleable and fooled when doted upon and given sweets and a smile. The mantra “never talk to strangers” is never more applicable than it is here. With something a tad off-kilter in the fantasy world, Coraline finds herself shaking it off and relishing the opportunity to experience all that she had dreamed of, not knowing that if her parents succeed with their new gardening catalog, those dreams will be fulfilled in reality. Patience is a virtue and youngsters unfortunately don’t learn that fact until they are all grown up, finding ways to apologize to their parents for being such confused and naïve monsters.

With some very nice voicework—Dakota Fanning shines as our titular heroine; Keith David’s baritone brings the cat’s mixture of foreboding and help to life and Robert Bailey Jr. gets the nervous tick and stammer on the nose for Wybie, (short for WhyBorn, now that’s a name you hope your parents never considered)—you do find yourself enveloped in this world. A rare thing for an animated film to begin with a cast listing, it thankfully doesn’t detract from the escapism by making you think of the actor rather than the character. This fact works best with the mother, played by Teri Hatcher. I would never have been able to pick her voice out, but that just enhances it all the more, breathing life into the stop-motion clay form on screen, becoming the wolf in sheep’s clothing villain necessary for it all to work.

Definitely soak in the aesthetic and intelligent storytelling as Coraline is for a thoughtful audience willing to delve deep into metaphors and hidden meaning. There is no “approved for your Attention Deficit Disorder child” stamp of approval here. In much the opposite direction, don’t be surprised if your child hates you for making them sit through it. However, it is a tale that will resonate for a portion of the public, hitting on their own feelings of selfishness and wanting the spoils without the work. When your child is intellectually mature enough to handle a rich and deep story, you as a parent will know. When he or she can see a couple of big-bosomed, large older women dressed as mermaids with pasties and not laugh or get uncomfortable, that is when you should let them see Coraline. It is ultimately a film for all ages; one that shows you as adults how it all will get better—junior will one day understand the sacrifices you are making—and you children a fantastical world to escape to with consequences that will shake you into the realization of what you have right in front of you at home.

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Coraline – A short clip from the film

Posted by LiveFor on January 28, 2009

Based on Neil Gaiman’s international best-selling book, Coraline is the story of a young girl (voiced by Dakota Fanning) who unlocks a mysterious door in her new home, and enters into an adventure in a parallel reality. On the surface, this other world eerily mimics her own life – though much more fantastical. In it, Coraline encounters such off-kilter inhabitants as the morbidly funny Miss Forcible and Miss Spink (Dawn French and Jennifer Saunders, respectively), and a counterfeit mother (Teri Hatcher) – who attempts to keep her. Ultimately, Coraline must count on her resourcefulness, determination, and bravery to get back home.

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The Graveyard Book – Another Neil Gaiman book heading for the big screen

Posted by LiveFor on January 27, 2009

Neil Jordan (Interview with a Vampire, A Company of Wolves) is down to direct a screen adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book. All things Gaiman are hot right now with Coraline being splashed all over the web.

I picked up The Graveyard Book for my Wife for Christmas. I’ve not read it yet, but by all accounts it is meant to be excellent.

Shocktillyoudrop had the story.

It was reported in October that Framestore, a UK-based FX house, picked up the rights to the story. Gaiman, out promoting Coraline, told The Today Show today about Jordan’s involvement.

“The Graveyard Book” focuses on the life of Nobody Owens, a boy raised by the dead in a cemetery. It was published by Harper Collins and released last year. Jordan was once attached to direct an adaptation of Joe Hill’s Heart-Shaped Box, but he backed out last summer.

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The Graveyard Book – Another Neil Gaiman book heading for the big screen

Posted by LiveFor on January 27, 2009

Neil Jordan (Interview with a Vampire, A Company of Wolves) is down to direct a screen adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book. All things Gaiman are hot right now with Coraline being splashed all over the web.

I picked up The Graveyard Book for my Wife for Christmas. I’ve not read it yet, but by all accounts it is meant to be excellent.

Shocktillyoudrop had the story.

It was reported in October that Framestore, a UK-based FX house, picked up the rights to the story. Gaiman, out promoting Coraline, told The Today Show today about Jordan’s involvement.

“The Graveyard Book” focuses on the life of Nobody Owens, a boy raised by the dead in a cemetery. It was published by Harper Collins and released last year. Jordan was once attached to direct an adaptation of Joe Hill’s Heart-Shaped Box, but he backed out last summer.

Discuss in the Forum

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