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Posts Tagged ‘Twilight Zone’

Twilight Zone art show at Gallery 1988

Posted by LiveFor on May 8, 2010

Gallery 1988 are having an exhibition of Twilight Zone inspired art and it looks like it could be epic.

More info on the Gallery 1988 website.

I love the one by Tom Whalen below from the episode “Nightmare at 20000 Feet.” The Shat is always good to watch.

Source: io9

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Film Production Nightmares

Posted by LiveFor on February 5, 2010

By Richard Bodsworth.

Benicio Del Toro stars in the remake of the 1941 classic horror The Wolfman which is set to open next week but it has not been an easy ride to get the finished product to the screen.  Mark Romanek left the project right before principal photography was about to start citing the old chestnut “creative differences” and was replaced by Jurassic Park 3 helmer, Joe Johnston.  The Wolfman is not the only film due this year which has had major production problems; Ridley Scott’s Robin Hood has also been hit with issues, most notably constant script rewrites resulting in the release date being pushed back numerous times.  Of course this is not a new thing, so let’s take a look at some other films which have struggled in production…

The Island of Dr. Moreau (1996)

Marlon Brando and Val Kilmer in the tropical rainforests of Australia, what could possibly go wrong? Um, a lot actually.  Three days in to production of the H.G Wells adaptation director Richard Stanley was given the heave-ho (a move apparently forced by Val Kilmer who earlier, for no apparent reason, decided he wanted his part drastically cut) and was replaced by John Frankenheimer, never a good start.  Brando and Frankenheimer then rewrote the majority of the script before later clashing over the direction the film was taking; Frankenheimer would also have heated exchanges with Val Kilmer several times throughout the shoot before vowing never to work with him again. Brando and Kilmer both had their own personal problems on-set, Kilmer being issued divorce papers on location while Brando struggled with the suicide of his daughter.  Amazingly Brando, who by this time had given up on the film, was fed his lines through a frequency radio.  David Thewlis (a late replacement for Rob Morrow) who would later skip the premiere supposedly said “He’d be in the middle of a scene and suddenly he’d be picking up police messages and Marlon would repeat ‘There’s a robbery at Woolworths’”.  The film received negative reviews and barely managed to scrape back its budget, Brando went on to win a Razzie for his performance.   

Twilight Zone: The Movie

Produced by Steven Spielberg, this feature length film of the classic 60’s TV show was split in to four segments, part one directed by John Landis, the second by Spielberg himself, Joe Dante directed the third and George Miller the fourth.  The events that occurred during the filming of Landis’ segment overshadowed the film itself as a freak accident cost the lives of actor Vic Morrow and two child actors.  Whilst filming a scene featuring a helicopter, pyrotechnics were set off but the helicopter was flying too low causing it to spin out of control and crash to the ground killing the trio.  Legal action followed and many regulations were changed including those that featured child and stunts filmed at night. 

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

Another well documented Gilliam nightmare, the guy seems to have no luck (here’s a nice article over at Hey You Guys http://tiny.cc/TerryGilliam). Being disrupted by a nearby NATO target area and a flash flood which would destroy equipment and locations were just the start before lead actor Jean Rochefort suffered a herniated disc cancelling production.  A blistering $15m insurance claim would later be brought and resulted in the company owning the rights to the film (these have since been transferred back to Gilliam). If you haven’t already seen Lost in La Mancha I recommend you do so, like now!  Gilliam has since resurrected the project however and hopes to start filming this year. Fingers crossed.

Alien 3.

One of the most obvious choices is Alien 3 because, well, it was a complete nightmare.  The film went through various writers starting with William Gibson, Near Dark scribe Eric Red to David Thwoy before Vincent Ward took over.  Ward had the idea of a wooden planet inhabited by monks, some of the set designs look great and it would have been very intriguing to see the finished product.  Ward however never got his chance as his idea was scrapped and he was replaced by David Fincher for his feature debut.  The script ended up as a mesh of various ideas from previous drafts which was thrown together by series producers Walter Hill and David Giler.  Since Fox wanted to rush the film out to hit their desired release date, Fincher went into the project without a set script and spent most of the time rewriting on set.  Trying the best he could, things got worse for Fincher when the film was reedited without his knowledge leaving him to basically disown the project.  The reception to the final cut was not great and generally regarded as the weakest of the four; you have to wonder how it would have turned out if Ward or Fincher were given full creative control.  If you can, try pick up the special edition DVD which features some interesting interviews and goes into detail about the early ideas and scripts; Fincher sadly does not feature in an interview.  

Apocalypse Now

The finished product may be classed as a cinematic masterpiece but all was not rosy during production of Francis Ford Coppola’s Vietnam War epic.  Martin Sheen replaced Harvey Keitel a few days into production before a typhoon destroyed some of the sets, including the Playboy Playmate set, leaving the project behind schedule and over budget.  That man Brando was at it again after he showed up on set far too fat to play Colonel Kurtz forcing Coppola into rewriting the ending which in itself would prove a mammoth task.  Things didn’t get much easier after star Martin Sheen suffered a heart attack on set and had to crawl in to the middle of the road to get help. But after a lengthy post production the film was released to both financial and critical acclaim winning the Palme d’Or in 1979 and still features on numerous “Best of All Time” lists. 

Caligula

A film starring Malcolm McDowell, Peter O’Toole and Helen Mirren charting the rise and fall of Roman Emperor Caligula sound like a classy affair right? Not quite.  Written by Gore Vidal as a historical drama the only we way to secure funding was by partnering with adult magazine, Penthouse, editor Bob Guccione which should have spelled trouble from the start.  Italian director Tinto Brass was hired but he would argue with both Vidal and art director Danillo Donati over both the script and set design.  Star McDowell and Brass would later try and rewrite the script and Vidal would subsequently have his name removed before launching legal action.  After Guccione saw Brass’ final cut he fired him and brought in Giancarlo Lui to reedit the film and reshoot about six minutes of hardcore pornography to replace Brass’ shots.  Before the film was released Brass would also launch a legal suit further delaying the films release.  When the film finally did make it to the screen it was universally panned.

Others include; almost anything to do with Edward Norton who has a tendency to rewrite his parts onset, he also tried to reedit American History X himself leading to director Tony Kaye unsuccessfully attempting to have his name removed from the credits.  Life on the Blade Runner set was also rather challenging for cast and crew with director Ridley Scott being a notorious hard-ass leading squabbles with Harrison Ford and protests from the crew, oh and then there was the infamous ‘final cut’.  Scott and our old chum Terry Gilliam have both suffered the tragic misfortune of an actor dying mid-shoot, Oliver Reed on Gladiator and Heath Ledger during The Imaginaruim of Dr. Parnassus.  There can’t possibly be anything worse than completing a film, a pretty good film at that, but having it shelved and reshot by Renny Harlin.  Well that’s what happened to Paul Schrader.  His film Dominion, a prequel to horror classic The Exorcist was deemed “too dark” by the studio and Harlin was brought in to hack together Exorcist: The Beginning

 So what others would you like to see on the list? The Wolfman hits cinemas from Friday 12th February (I believe there are advance previews Wednesday and Thursday) keep an eye out for the LFF review.

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The Box – Early review of Richard Kelly’s new film

Posted by LiveFor on October 22, 2009

boxRichard Kelly is the bloke behind the brilliant Donnie Darko (the director’s cut sucked though). He then made Southland Tales which was a huge flop (although Jinja tells me it is not quite as bad as everyone said, just a bit of a mess).

As previously reported Kelly’s next film is based on the Richard Matheson story – Button, Button – now retitled The Box. It stars James Marsden (X-Men, 27 Dresses, Hairspray) and Cameron Diaz (Charlie’s Angels, The Mask).

Hollywood Elsewhere had a review from an Australian Critic called Don Groves and unfortunately it looks as if The Box may be more Southland Tales than Donnie Darko.

“This period sci-fi thriller (i.e., set in the mid ’70s) suffers from a complete lack of logic and woeful miscasting of the lead roles — and, worse, is almost totally devoid of tension.

“Inspired by ‘Button, Button,’ a 1970s short story by Richard Matheson, the film flounders on its preposterous premise: What would you do if someone offered you a million bucks to press a red button that would cause someone, somewhere — a person you didn’t know — to die?

“Anyone with half a brain would tell the crackpot making this offer to shove the box where the sun don’t shine, but not schoolteacher Norma (Cameron Diaz) and her NASA engineer husband Arthur (James Marsden). They’re short of money, you see, because Norma has just learned she won’t get the employee discount to enable her to keep their son in the private school where she works, she’ll have to postpone reconstructive surgery on her mangled foot, and Arthur’s application to become an astronaut is rejected after he failed the psych test.

“So they toy with taking up the offer from the mysterious Arlington Steward (Frank Langella), an elegantly-dressed, courteous chap with a horribly disfigured face. “I assure you I am not a monster, just a man with a job to do,” he intones gravely. The next day, Norma impetuously presses the button, and, across town in Virginia, a woman is shot dead.

“Steward duly delivers the loot and departs to tempt some other hapless couple. Not once does this well-educated, middle-class couple ask him if anyone died as a result of Norma’s succumbing to temptation. Is that plausible?

“The rest of the movie is an incoherent mess filled with clues, red herrings and non-sequiturs. Random people keep getting nosebleeds. There’s a creepy student, a tormented babysitter, inept efforts by Arthur’s cop father-in-law to investigate these peculiar events, and some psychobabble about the ‘path to salvation.’

“Who employs Steward and has orchestrated his mission? All is revealed, sort of, but little of it makes sense. In essence, Kelly appears to be using a muddle-headed morality play to remind us we’re all responsible for the consequences of our actions. Like, who needs reminding?

“Affecting an annoying Southern accent, Diaz struggles to make Norma seem remotely interesting or worthy of sympathy, despite the predicament she precipitates. Marsden lacks the authority to be believable as a NASA engineer and is barely adequate as a husband and father who’s faced with a cruel dilemma. There is almost zero chemistry between them, which makes it hard to believe they’re a loving couple. Old pro Langella is suitably creepy and menacing, but his efforts are wasted.

“To reflect the 1976 setting, Kelly and his cinematographer Steven Poster drained much of the color, resulting in a cold, flat and uninviting look — rather like the film itself. And was wallpaper of that era really so ugly?”

Posted in Film, Horror, news, Review, Sci-Fi, Thriller, Trailer | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Thomas Jane talks about Dark Country

Posted by LiveFor on October 6, 2009

the_dark_country08Thomas Jane (The Punisher, The Mist, Hung) is a Live for Films favourite and I have been following his directorial debut, Dark Country, for a while now (although I have still not had a chance to see it). It is a noir film shot in 3D starring Jane, Ron Perlman, Lauren German and a few others. So the studio decide to release it direct to DVD in 2D! Lack of logic behind that decision makes my brain hurt.

The film stars Jane and Lauren German (Hostel: Part II) as a couple traveling through the desert from Las Vegas to California who come upon a mysterious stranger. After almost killing the stranger, they pick him up and begin their journey into darkness.

Be that as it may, it still sounds very cool and Thomas Jane has been chatting to Bloody Disgusting about the film.

They asked him about the whole look and feel of the film. The way it had a very 50’s kind of feel and whether that had been his intention from the start.

“Definitely something I brought to the picture. I am really inspired by noir film, and by the Twilight Zone… this film felt like an extended Twilight zone episode to me. And then for film noir, particularly the cinematographer John Altman, who worked with Anthony Mann on films like Raw Deal, and He Walked By Night. I wanted to make something very modern, but also timeless, yet very steeped in film noir. I came up with a visual style that was influenced by these things but also something a little unique that I can call my own. Watching the movie, I don’t think you can say that I’m aping anyone else’s style. The type of story that it is dictated the style of the film. And also I’m a big comic book guy, I love graphic novels, I published a couple of my own through my company Raw Studios. I worked with Tim Bradstreet who is a fantastic illustrator in the comic book world – he did all of the Punisher covers – and he was the visual consultant and production designer on Dark Country. And Bernie Wrightson, who is a master horror illustrator, he did the character designs for Bloody-face. So these influences created the style and tone that you see in the film. The muted colors, the crushed blacks, not a lot of mid-tones, almost like a black and white movie. When I developed the script with Tad Murphy, that was the way I wanted to tell the story, with a unique visual structure.”


The fact he got Tim Bradstreet (check out his cool poster for the film) and Bernie Wrightson involved means you know it is going to look amazing. Two very cool comic book artists there.

Then there is the fact he got Hellboy himself involved.

“I’m a friend of Ron’s, and I think he FITS in the genre. The movie is made for people who like this left of center stuff. It’s a very graphic novel oriented film, with influences from film noir, Carnival of Souls, cult movie influences…. this is a movie for people who enjoy that type of stuff, and to me, Ron Perlman is the perfect actor for a movie like this. He’s got a great following, and I’ve been a fan of his for a long time, and we became pals when we did Mutant Chronicles together. So we had a blast, and Ron coming on board… he just fit the story perfectly. Very proud to have him in my first film, and he also helped give me confidence as a director, he’s very easy to work with. A fantastic guy. Damn lucky to have him.”


Head on over to check out the full interview over on BD. He talks about directing himself, his Bad Planet comic and the 3D aspect of the film.

Have you seen the film? If so what did you think of it?

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The Box – Richard Kelly speaks and Cameron Diaz gives the game away

Posted by LiveFor on July 27, 2009

I am looking forward to this film. I love a bit of Twilight Zone shenanigans.

Norma (Cameron Diaz) and Arthur Lewis (James Marsden) are faced with a terrible dilemma when a mysterious glass box turns up at their door. If they press the button inside the box, they’ll get enough money to save their ailing son, but in exchange, someone, somewhere in the world will die. When the temptation to save their beloved son becomes too much to bear, Norma pushes the button. Immediately, a gunshot rings out somewhere nearby. Consumed with guilt, Norma must do everything in her power to solve a murder she has knowingly caused. The Box is director Richard (Donnie Darko) Kelly’s latest thriller.

The Box is due out on 30th October 2009.

MovieWeb had this chat with director Richard Kelly.

Cameron Diaz has also been talking about the film (via Filmstalker) and has given what could be huge spoilers. They are in invisitext below so click and drag the mouse if you want to read them.

The first is about the origin of the box, it’s from another planet, a race from Mars no less.

The second is that this Martian race is testing humankind for some reason, and the box is the test.

I’m not sure what to make of that. May be true, may not be. Could work or it could suck. If you read the spoilers what do you think of it? Beware there could be spoilers in the comments.

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UPDATED: The Box – Trailer for Richard Kelly’s latest film

Posted by LiveFor on June 25, 2009

Have a look at this trailer as I think it is very good. The Box is based on the short story “Button, Button” by Richard Matheson and was used in an episode of The Twilight Zone. It is the one where a couple are given a box with a button. They are told that if they press the button they’ll get a million dollars, but someone they don’t know will die. Bit of a moral dilemma.

Now Richard Kelly (Donnie Darko, Southland Tales) has adapted it into a full length feature starring Cameron Diaz, James Marsden, and Frank Langella. It looks as if Kelly is back to his Darko goodness after the disappointing and confusing Southland Tales.

The film is set in the 70s and in a way is autobiographical as the two main characters are based on Richard Kelly’s own parents.

Let me know what you thought of the trailer. Would you press the button?

UPDATE: I found the story about the film being semi-autobiographical. It was an interview with Richard Kelly over on AICN. Well worth a read as he talks about technical aspects of the film as well as developing the story. This is what he had to say about his parents being an influence on the film.

The short story is six pages long, and Arthur and Norma… there wasn’t time for their backstory. So I thought, “Here’s this amazing premise about greed and responsibility and so many things that you can’t put into words. There’s this button, and being responsible for the death of another human being, and what constitutes responsibility.” And I thought, “We want to tell this story and expose this premise to two characters, let them be very moral people, very likable people.” And I figured that I felt that way about my parents, and that this is the type of movie they would love. They exposed me to Alfred Hitchcock when I was a young teenager; they showed me REAR WINDOW and THE BIRDS and PSYCHO. So I thought, “What if I take their love story and life in Richmond, Virginia as an upwardly middle class couple in 1976, and place them into Richard Matheson’s short story?” And that’s what I did – which all of a sudden made it the most personal film I’ve ever made. (Laughs) They have a son [in the film] who’s ten or eleven. I obviously would barely be one year old in 1976, but you could argue that their single child is maybe a representation of me in the story. So all of a sudden I feel like I’m making this profoundly personal film, which, at the same time, is this mainstream studio thriller with this high-concept premise. So it was sort of an interesting merger of my parents’ story with Matheson’s story, which was written before I was even alive but that I discovered on THE TWILIGHT ZONE in 1986. I was in my parents’ bedroom watching THE TWILIGHT ZONE with my dad when I saw “Button, Button” for the first time. So to think that I’ve taken them and plugged them into this Matheson concept is… to this day, I can’t believe that we pulled it off.

So that’s why Jimmy and Cameron spent a lot of time around my parents. Cameron listened to my mom talk for forty-five minutes and recorded it. She recorded a phone conversation of my mom talking about her life. And then she went to a dialogue coach to learn how to do my mom’s Texas accent. Meanwhile, Jimmy did a Virginia accent because my dad’s from Virginia. Their Southern accents are slightly different. And when my parents came on set for five or six shooting days, they were just freaking out. They felt like they had stepped into a TWILIGHT ZONE episode by being on set. It’s very meta. You have my parents feeling like they’re in a TWILIGHT ZONE episode watching James Marsden and Cameron Diaz portray very personal, autobiographical things about their life with their son directing it in this amazing Richard Matheson story that we’ve all grown up with. (Laughs It was really, really interesting.

Then we shot at NASA down at Langley for a week, which is where my dad worked for fifteen years. Marsden drives a silver Corvetts in the film – and my dad didn’t drive a Corvette; he drove a Pontiac. But Marsden drives into this press conference at the NASA campus facility down there where my dad attended the press conference for Viking. He also used to play basketball for the NASA basketball league. But literally my dad is looking at a younger version of himself driving to work in the same exact manner that he did at a place that hasn’t changed since the ’70s. The Langley facility down at NASA has not changed at all since the ’70s; it’s like you’re in a time warp down there. So it was really pretty surreal. It really gave Jimmy and Cameron homework to do. That’s one thing: you want your actors to leave your meeting with a big stack of books, because then they come back to you with so much and so many questions. You get a lot of the direction out of the way, so when you’re on set you can focus on the details. Everyone’s not trying to play catch up.

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Terminator and The Twilight Zone -Cool Fan art Posters in a noir style

Posted by LiveFor on November 23, 2008


I think these are are cool. I’ve posted other ones that NinjaInk has done for The Punisher, Transformers, Watchmen and Spider-Man in this styleCheck out these and more at NinjaInk’s (Timothy Lim) Deviant Art site.
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